Collins, Gideon participate in WMTW debate

With six days before the November election, Republican Sen. Susan Collins and her Democratic challenger, Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon met for a final debate of the 2020 campaign.The debate was held in the studios of WMTW News 8.Collins and Gideon clashed on what voters say is their #1 issue: the coronavirus. Collins said she helped write the congressional bills that included aid for small businesses. “These bills have brought $8.3 billion to the state of Maine. That is more than double the annual state budget.” Collins said. “By contrast, Sara adjourned the legislature in mid-March. She promised help to small business but did not deliver.” Gideon said the GOP-led U.S. Senate has fallen short. “I will hold my record and our record in the Maine State Legislature up to the record of you and the Republican-controlled Senate any day.” Gideon replied.”It has been six months — six months — and you’ve continued to confirm judicial nominees, while the people in Maine and businesses are shuttering.” Gideon also blamed the senator for a recent case soon to be heard by the Supreme Court after the election that could dismantle the act altogether.”Sen. Collins paved the way for that lawsuit with her vote in 2017, and in Maine under my leadership we picked up the pieces, making sure we have put patient protections into law.” “I worked in state government to provide that protection when I was in state government and Sara was in Rhode Island,” Collins responded. “What Sara supports, and I do not, is imposing a $1,000 penalty on people who cannot afford insurance.” After the ascension of Justice Amy Coney Barrett to the court, Collins asserted her view that legal abortion is secure. “I don’t think the Supreme Court is going to strike down Roe v. Wade,” she said. “I absolutely support reproductive health care, reproductive rights, and choice,” Gideon said. Gideon repeatedly tied Collins to Senate Republican leadership. “As long as Susan Collins is our senator, Mitch McConnell will remain that majority leader.” When asked, Collins declined to say if she thinks President Trump deserves four more years. “I’m not getting involved in presidential politics, but I don’t want to see one party control in Congress.” There was one Hallmark moment, when asked about anything they admire in their opponent, they each praised the other for their public service.

With six days before the November election, Republican Sen. Susan Collins and her Democratic challenger, Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon met for a final debate of the 2020 campaign.

Advertisement

The debate was held in the studios of WMTW News 8.

Collins and Gideon clashed on what voters say is their #1 issue: the coronavirus. Collins said she helped write the congressional bills that included aid for small businesses.

“These bills have brought $8.3 billion to the state of Maine. That is more than double the annual state budget.” Collins said. “By contrast, Sara adjourned the legislature in mid-March. She promised help to small business but did not deliver.”

Gideon said the GOP-led U.S. Senate has fallen short.

“I will hold my record and our record in the Maine State Legislature up to the record of you and the Republican-controlled Senate any day.” Gideon replied.”It has been six months — six months — and you’ve continued to confirm judicial nominees, while the people in Maine and businesses are shuttering.”

Gideon also blamed the senator for a recent case soon to be heard by the Supreme Court after the election that could dismantle the act altogether.

“Sen. Collins paved the way for that lawsuit with her vote in 2017, and in Maine under my leadership we picked up the pieces, making sure we have put patient protections into law.”

“I worked in state government to provide that protection when I was in state government and Sara was in Rhode Island,” Collins responded. “What Sara supports, and I do not, is imposing a $1,000 penalty on people who cannot afford insurance.”

After the ascension of Justice Amy Coney Barrett to the court, Collins asserted her view that legal abortion is secure.

“I don’t think the Supreme Court is going to strike down Roe v. Wade,” she said.

“I absolutely support reproductive health care, reproductive rights, and choice,” Gideon said.

Gideon repeatedly tied Collins to Senate Republican leadership.

“As long as Susan Collins is our senator, Mitch McConnell will remain that majority leader.”

When asked, Collins declined to say if she thinks President Trump deserves four more years.

“I’m not getting involved in presidential politics, but I don’t want to see one party control in Congress.”

There was one Hallmark moment, when asked about anything they admire in their opponent, they each praised the other for their public service.