Family demands release of evidence in Breonna Taylor’s case

For the first time, the family of Breonna Taylor spoke out after a decision was announced in the investigation into the 26-year-old’s deadly shooting.The much-awaited decision, made public Wednesday by Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, resulted in only one of the officers involved being indicted for wanton endangerment. The three counts stem from former Louisville officer Brett Hankison’s shots that went into a neighboring apartment where a family lived the night of the March raid.Neither Hankison nor the two other officers at the center of the probe — Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove — were charged in Taylor’s killing.On Friday, Taylor’s relatives addressed the public for the first time regarding the investigation during a news conference at Jefferson Square Park.The family was also joined by their attorneys. Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, said in a statement read by a relative to a gathering in Louisville that she did not expect justice from Cameron.“I am an angry Black woman. I am not angry for the reasons that you would like me to be. But angry because our Black women keep dying at the hands of police officers — and Black men,” Palmer wrote in a statement that was read by a relative as she stood close by in a shirt that had “I (heart) Louisville Police” with bullet holes in the heart emoji.In her statement, Palmer said the entire justice system had failed her, and state Attorney General Daniel Cameron was just the final person in the chain that included the officer who sought the no-knock warrant as part of a drug investigation, the judge who signed it, and the police who burst into her Louisville apartment. The warrant was connected to a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.Ben Crump, a lawyer for the family, urged the prosecutor to make the transcripts public, so people can see if anyone was present at the grand jury proceedings to give a voice to Taylor. Gov. Andy Beshear has also called for Cameron to release what evidence he can.Cameron’s spokeswoman, Elizabeth Kuhn, said the prosecutor understood that Taylor’s family “is in an incredible amount of pain and anguish” and that the grand jury decision was not the one they wanted. But, the statement added, “prosecutors and grand jury members are bound by the facts and by the law.”Cameron earlier reaffirmed that the lack of body camera footage made the case difficult, so his team had to use ballistic evidence, 911 calls, interviews and radio traffic.Based on this evidence, Cameron said he and the grand jury agreed that the officers were justified in the shooting since Kenneth Walker, admittedly, fired first.Cameron said he does not plan to release the investigative files in the Taylor probe because he said he does not want to taint Hankison’s trial.“I hope you never know the pain of your child being murdered 191 days in a row,” said Bianca Austin, reading Palmer’s statement while wearing Taylor’s emergency medical technician jacket.On Friday, Cameron said through a spokesperson he understood Taylor’s family’s pain“Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but prosecutors and Grand Jury members are bound by the facts and by the law,” spokeswoman Elizabeth Kuhn said in a statement.The Taylor family is now awaiting the results of an FBI investigation into whether Taylor’s civil rights were violated. They’re also thinking about other ways to advance racial justice amid the ongoing calls from community activists.On Friday, protesters — some of whom brought their dogs — marched through Louisville with a purple banner with Taylor’s name on it. They danced and chanted “bow for Breonna.” Some handed out pizza or water. Earlier, as they gathered, some people were trying to register voters.Police in Louisville later blocked the route of a protest march, warning demonstrators they could face arrest for unlawful assembly. Then marchers began turning around after a tense encounter with helmeted police in riot gear.Marchers were headed through Louisville’s downtown Friday evening when they came upon a number of police officers lined up near an underpass. Associated Press journalists in Louisville saw — and video showed — some officers firing flash bang devices. Amid ensuing confusion, marchers pulled back but seemed to remain peaceful.At least two people could be seen being taken into custody near the underpass in police video streamed online.Some protesters argued with police that the march was peaceful. Others pleaded with the crowd to take to the sidewalks and retreat. People dispersed in different directions.At least 24 people were arrested in the Louisville protests Thursday night that authorities said resulted in some vandalism. Among those arrested was state Rep. Attica Scott, a Louisville Democrat, who said she was detained minutes before a curfew started as she headed toward a church that protesters were congregating in.“It’s clear that this alphabet soup of law enforcement that’s here in Louisville, both local, state and federal law enforcement, are preparing for battle, for war against the people they are supposed to protect and serve,” Scott said Friday after spending the night in jail.The curfew in Louisville will continue through the weekend, and the governor called up the National Guard for “limited missions.”The Associated Press contributed to this report.

For the first time, the family of Breonna Taylor spoke out after a decision was announced in the investigation into the 26-year-old’s deadly shooting.

The much-awaited decision, made public Wednesday by Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, resulted in only one of the officers involved being indicted for wanton endangerment. The three counts stem from former Louisville officer Brett Hankison’s shots that went into a neighboring apartment where a family lived the night of the March raid.

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Neither Hankison nor the two other officers at the center of the probe — Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove — were charged in Taylor’s killing.

On Friday, Taylor’s relatives addressed the public for the first time regarding the investigation during a news conference at Jefferson Square Park.

The family was also joined by their attorneys.

Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, said in a statement read by a relative to a gathering in Louisville that she did not expect justice from Cameron.

“I am an angry Black woman. I am not angry for the reasons that you would like me to be. But angry because our Black women keep dying at the hands of police officers — and Black men,” Palmer wrote in a statement that was read by a relative as she stood close by in a shirt that had “I (heart) Louisville Police” with bullet holes in the heart emoji.

In her statement, Palmer said the entire justice system had failed her, and state Attorney General Daniel Cameron was just the final person in the chain that included the officer who sought the no-knock warrant as part of a drug investigation, the judge who signed it, and the police who burst into her Louisville apartment. The warrant was connected to a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.

Ben Crump, a lawyer for the family, urged the prosecutor to make the transcripts public, so people can see if anyone was present at the grand jury proceedings to give a voice to Taylor. Gov. Andy Beshear has also called for Cameron to release what evidence he can.

Cameron’s spokeswoman, Elizabeth Kuhn, said the prosecutor understood that Taylor’s family “is in an incredible amount of pain and anguish” and that the grand jury decision was not the one they wanted. But, the statement added, “prosecutors and grand jury members are bound by the facts and by the law.”

Cameron earlier reaffirmed that the lack of body camera footage made the case difficult, so his team had to use ballistic evidence, 911 calls, interviews and radio traffic.

Based on this evidence, Cameron said he and the grand jury agreed that the officers were justified in the shooting since Kenneth Walker, admittedly, fired first.

Cameron said he does not plan to release the investigative files in the Taylor probe because he said he does not want to taint Hankison’s trial.

“I hope you never know the pain of your child being murdered 191 days in a row,” said Bianca Austin, reading Palmer’s statement while wearing Taylor’s emergency medical technician jacket.

On Friday, Cameron said through a spokesperson he understood Taylor’s family’s pain

“Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but prosecutors and Grand Jury members are bound by the facts and by the law,” spokeswoman Elizabeth Kuhn said in a statement.

The Taylor family is now awaiting the results of an FBI investigation into whether Taylor’s civil rights were violated. They’re also thinking about other ways to advance racial justice amid the ongoing calls from community activists.

On Friday, protesters — some of whom brought their dogs — marched through Louisville with a purple banner with Taylor’s name on it. They danced and chanted “bow for Breonna.” Some handed out pizza or water. Earlier, as they gathered, some people were trying to register voters.

Police in Louisville later blocked the route of a protest march, warning demonstrators they could face arrest for unlawful assembly. Then marchers began turning around after a tense encounter with helmeted police in riot gear.

Marchers were headed through Louisville’s downtown Friday evening when they came upon a number of police officers lined up near an underpass. Associated Press journalists in Louisville saw — and video showed — some officers firing flash bang devices. Amid ensuing confusion, marchers pulled back but seemed to remain peaceful.

At least two people could be seen being taken into custody near the underpass in police video streamed online.

Some protesters argued with police that the march was peaceful. Others pleaded with the crowd to take to the sidewalks and retreat. People dispersed in different directions.

At least 24 people were arrested in the Louisville protests Thursday night that authorities said resulted in some vandalism. Among those arrested was state Rep. Attica Scott, a Louisville Democrat, who said she was detained minutes before a curfew started as she headed toward a church that protesters were congregating in.

“It’s clear that this alphabet soup of law enforcement that’s here in Louisville, both local, state and federal law enforcement, are preparing for battle, for war against the people they are supposed to protect and serve,” Scott said Friday after spending the night in jail.

The curfew in Louisville will continue through the weekend, and the governor called up the National Guard for “limited missions.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.