How to exercise safely in the heat, humidity

Maine is experiencing another shot of hot and humid weather this week, but that doesn’t mean you need to cancel your outdoor workout amid the dog days of summer.Experts said if you plan to exercise outdoors to do it early or late in the day.”Those midday times are definitely going to be the worst. If you do have to go out in the mid-time, or whether it’s early or late, make sure once again you’re well hydrated. That lessens your chance of a heat illness,” Dr. Jeffrey Bean, of Spectrum Healthcare Partners said.Wearing lighter clothing, a hat and sunscreen can also help keep you safe.Bean said it is important to know the difference between heat exhaustion and heatstroke.Heat exhaustion is when your skin is pale, clammy and you sweat a lot. Heatstroke is a more serious condition.”You start to feel more neurological signs and symptoms, more dizziness, much more confused. People will say they’re acting much different than they normally do. It just doesn’t seem right,” Bean said.Bean said hydrating before and after a workout is key, but he said it is important to listen to your body and drink to your thirst.”What you don’t want to do is what we see for people who don’t exercise a lot, and they’re going to go run a marathon and they drink too much. They actually get what we call hyponatremia, where your sodium level in your body is too low because you drink too much and that’s actually extremely dangerous,” Bean said.Overall, getting outside in the fresh air, even for a few minutes, can do a lot of good for your physical and mental health.

Maine is experiencing another shot of hot and humid weather this week, but that doesn’t mean you need to cancel your outdoor workout amid the dog days of summer.

Experts said if you plan to exercise outdoors to do it early or late in the day.

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“Those midday times are definitely going to be the worst. If you do have to go out in the mid-time, or whether it’s early or late, make sure once again you’re well hydrated. That lessens your chance of a heat illness,” Dr. Jeffrey Bean, of Spectrum Healthcare Partners said.

Wearing lighter clothing, a hat and sunscreen can also help keep you safe.

Bean said it is important to know the difference between heat exhaustion and heatstroke.

Heat exhaustion is when your skin is pale, clammy and you sweat a lot. Heatstroke is a more serious condition.

“You start to feel more neurological signs and symptoms, more dizziness, much more confused. People will say they’re acting much different than they normally do. It just doesn’t seem right,” Bean said.

Bean said hydrating before and after a workout is key, but he said it is important to listen to your body and drink to your thirst.

“What you don’t want to do is what we see for people who don’t exercise a lot, and they’re going to go run a marathon and they drink too much. They actually get what we call hyponatremia, where your sodium level in your body is too low because you drink too much and that’s actually extremely dangerous,” Bean said.

Overall, getting outside in the fresh air, even for a few minutes, can do a lot of good for your physical and mental health.