Hundreds honor the life and legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg during Portland vigil

A crowd gathered in Portland’s Monument Square Sunday evening, joining the thousands across the U.S. mourning the loss of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The vigil was hosted by the progressive advocacy groups “We Are Maine,” “March Forth Main,” and “Mainers For Accountable Leadership.” Organizers moved the event to Sunday so it wouldn’t conflict with the Rosh Hashanah, the start of the Jewish New Year. Ginsburg was the first Jewish woman to serve on the Supreme Court. The 87-year-old was the senior member of the court’s liberal wing. As a justice, Ginsburg consistently voted in favor of abortion access and civil rights.Perhaps her best-known work on the court was writing the 1996 landmark decision to strike down the Virginia Military Institute’s ban on admitting women.Attendees at the vigil said they hoped to honor her legacy by continuing the fight against gender discrimination in politics, in the workplace, and in culture altogether. “She brought some of the most famous cases about women’s rights to the Supreme Court as an attorney for the ACLU,” said State Senator Shenna Bellows, who attended tonight’s candlelit vigil for Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “So she was a personal hero and inspiration and as a Supreme Court justice her dissents became famous.” Some in Portland also expressed concerns that lawmakers in Washington would not honor Ginsburg’s dying wish, by holding a vote on her replacement before November’s presidential election.

A crowd gathered in Portland’s Monument Square Sunday evening, joining the thousands across the U.S. mourning the loss of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The vigil was hosted by the progressive advocacy groups “We Are Maine,” “March Forth Main,” and “Mainers For Accountable Leadership.”

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Organizers moved the event to Sunday so it wouldn’t conflict with the Rosh Hashanah, the start of the Jewish New Year.

Ginsburg was the first Jewish woman to serve on the Supreme Court. The 87-year-old was the senior member of the court’s liberal wing. As a justice, Ginsburg consistently voted in favor of abortion access and civil rights.

Perhaps her best-known work on the court was writing the 1996 landmark decision to strike down the Virginia Military Institute’s ban on admitting women.

Attendees at the vigil said they hoped to honor her legacy by continuing the fight against gender discrimination in politics, in the workplace, and in culture altogether.

“She brought some of the most famous cases about women’s rights to the Supreme Court as an attorney for the ACLU,” said State Senator Shenna Bellows, who attended tonight’s candlelit vigil for Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “So she was a personal hero and inspiration and as a Supreme Court justice her dissents became famous.”

Some in Portland also expressed concerns that lawmakers in Washington would not honor Ginsburg’s dying wish, by holding a vote on her replacement before November’s presidential election.