Joe Biden formally nominated as Democratic party’s presidential nominee

Live updates below are listed in EST:10:55 p.m.Joe Biden’s cross-party friendship with the late Arizona Sen. John McCain was remembered in an emotional video at the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday, one that featured the voice of McCain’s widow, Cindy McCain.The video recalls how Biden and McCain met — the former Arizona senator was assigned to Biden as a military aide on a foreign trip — and how their relationship blossomed when they were both in the Senate.10:45 p.m.Colin Powell, a Republican who has frequently broken ranks to back Democratic presidential candidates, made the case for Biden as a uniter who would make Americans proud when he hits the world stage.“With Joe Biden in the White House, you will never doubt that he will stand with our friends and stand up to our adversaries — never the other way around,” Powell said. “He will trust our diplomats and our intelligence community, not the flattery of dictators and despots.”Powell, a retired four-star general who served as secretary of state during President George W. Bush’s first term, including the invasion of Iraq, also pointed to the military service of Biden’s son, the late Beau Biden, who was deployed there in 2008 and 2009.“Our country needs a commander-in-chief who takes care of our troops in the same way he would his own family,” Powell said. “For Joe Biden, that doesn’t need teaching. It comes from the experience he shares with millions of military families — sending his beloved son off to war and praying to God he would come home safe.”Powell also addressed Trump’s performance on the home front. “Today, we are a country divided, and we have a president doing everything in his power to make it that way and keep us that way,” he said. “What a difference it will make to have a president who unites us, who restores our strength and our soul.” Related video: Colin Powell endorses Joe Biden10:05 p.m.Joe Biden has formally been nominated as the Democratic party’s nominee for president. Biden surpassed the required 2,374 delegates needed to formally become the nominee during a roll call Tuesday night. Biden is expected to formally accept the nomination in a speech Thursday. Delegates from each state took a roll call vote during the second night of the virtual Democratic National Convention on Tuesday, awarding Biden the position. Usually, each state calls out the number of delegates that different candidates won there during the primary in a dramatic fashion in a sports arena or large hall — but the count was all done online this time.Biden actually clinched the nomination in early June. His other challengers in the once-crowded Democratic presidential primary had left the race, and the votes of seven states and the District of Columbia gave him the 1,991 delegates to the convention needed to lock it up.A former senator from Delaware and vice president, Biden first ran for president in 1988 and tried again in 2008 before launching his 2020 campaign last year.President Donald Trump faced only token opposition in his party’s primary and will formally be renominated as his party’s candidate during the virtual Republican National Convention next week.9:45 p.m.Instead of a traditional roll call vote, where Democrats from each state and territory boast about the place they’re representing and announce how many delegates they have for the nominee, the party is formally nominating Biden with pretaped segments. The roll call will go alphabetically through the 57 states, territories and the Democrats Abroad delegation, meaning Alabama will lead off.“You’re going to see very iconic symbols of America embodied from every state,” Perez said, calling it one of the week’s highlights.Alabama led off the roll call from the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, site of the voting rights marches of 1965 and the Bloody Sunday encounter when state troopers beat and nearly killed civil rights icon John Lewis and other marchers. The late congressman, an Alabama native, died in July after representing Georgia in Congress for more than 30 years.Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell, a Selma native, delivered her delegation’s votes on Biden’s nomination.9:30 p.m.Bill Clinton delivered a stinging attack on President Donald Trump, saying the nation knows what he’d do with four more years in the White House: “Blame, bully and belittle.”The former president addressed the second night of the virtual Democratic National Convention on Tuesday and said Trump “defines the job as spending hours a day watching TV and zapping people on social media.”Clinton said, “Denying, distracting, and demeaning works great if you’re trying to entertain and inflame. But in a real crisis, it collapses like a house of cards.”He also praised Democratic candidate Joe Biden but spent far more time on the offensive against Trump, who defeated his wife, Hillary, to clinch the presidency in 2016.Bill Clinton played a major role in conventions for four decades but was limited to five minutes on Tuesday.But even abbreviated, his appearance is tricky for Democrats. In the #MeToo era, as the party is focused on overt appeals to female voters, putting Clinton on stage is problematic for Democrats, given the numerous accusations of sexual misconduct against him.9:25 p.m.Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer made a pitch at the Democratic National Convention not just for Joe Biden, but for flipping control of the Senate to Democrats.Schumer said Tuesday: “If we are going to win this battle for the soul of our nation, Joe can’t do it alone. Democrats must take back the Senate.”The New York Democrat outlined a potential 2021 agenda on making health care “affordable for all” and tackling income inequality, climate change and other issues, including the COVID-19 crisis.With the Statue of Liberty as a backdrop, he said President Donald Trump has “demeaned” everything it stands for.“America, Donald Trump has quit on you,” he said.“We need a president with dignity, integrity, and the experience to lead us out of this crisis, a man with a steady hand and a big heart who will never — ever — quit on America,” he said. “That man is my friend Joe Biden. He will be a great president.”9:20 p.m.Former acting Attorney General Sally Yates says President Donald Trump has “trampled the rule of law” and treats the country like a “family business.”Yates spoke Tuesday on the second night of the Democratic National Convention.She said she never expected to be speaking at a convention but the future of the country was at stake. She said Trump’s Democratic opponent, Joe Biden, represented the best of the country and said America needed a president who respected its laws and “would restore the soul of America.”Yates served as deputy attorney general during the Obama administration and stayed on as acting attorney during the early days of the T acting attorney general in the first days of the Trump administration, when she was fired by the president for refusing to defend the travel ban.9:10 p.m.The pageantry often associated with presidential conventions is being remade again as Democrats gather virtually for a second day.The Tuesday night keynote speech has historically been a star-making opportunity. It’s where a state senator from Illinois named Barack Obama become a household name. It’s also where Julian Castro, then the mayor of San Antonio made his national debut in 2012 before going on to serve in the Obama administration and run for president in 2020.Instead of giving the speaking slot to one up-and-comer, Democrats divided it up among a diverse group of 17 “rising stars.”They included Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams, who was considered a contender for Biden’s running mate; Nevada state Sen. Yvanna Cancela, the former political director for the powerful Las Vegas casino workers’ union; Mayor Robert Garcia of Long Beach, California, who became the city’s first openly gay mayor in 2014; Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez; and New Hampshire state Rep. Denny Ruprecht, who became that state’s youngest lawmaker when he was elected in 2018 at age 19.The roll call vote of state delegations, which typically unfolds over several hours of fanfare, will instead be abbreviated Tuesday.Though Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez is in Milwaukee, the convention host city, most party and elected officials, activists and musical acts will be appearing from livestreams and pretaped videos from around the country.

Live updates below are listed in EST:

10:55 p.m.

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Joe Biden’s cross-party friendship with the late Arizona Sen. John McCain was remembered in an emotional video at the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday, one that featured the voice of McCain’s widow, Cindy McCain.

10:45 p.m.

Colin Powell, a Republican who has frequently broken ranks to back Democratic presidential candidates, made the case for Biden as a uniter who would make Americans proud when he hits the world stage.

“With Joe Biden in the White House, you will never doubt that he will stand with our friends and stand up to our adversaries — never the other way around,” Powell said. “He will trust our diplomats and our intelligence community, not the flattery of dictators and despots.”

Powell, a retired four-star general who served as secretary of state during President George W. Bush’s first term, including the invasion of Iraq, also pointed to the military service of Biden’s son, the late Beau Biden, who was deployed there in 2008 and 2009.

“Our country needs a commander-in-chief who takes care of our troops in the same way he would his own family,” Powell said. “For Joe Biden, that doesn’t need teaching. It comes from the experience he shares with millions of military families — sending his beloved son off to war and praying to God he would come home safe.”

Powell also addressed Trump’s performance on the home front.

“Today, we are a country divided, and we have a president doing everything in his power to make it that way and keep us that way,” he said. “What a difference it will make to have a president who unites us, who restores our strength and our soul.”

Related video: Colin Powell endorses Joe Biden


10:05 p.m.

Joe Biden has formally been nominated as the Democratic party’s nominee for president. Biden surpassed the required 2,374 delegates needed to formally become the nominee during a roll call Tuesday night. Biden is expected to formally accept the nomination in a speech Thursday.

Delegates from each state took a roll call vote during the second night of the virtual Democratic National Convention on Tuesday, awarding Biden the position. Usually, each state calls out the number of delegates that different candidates won there during the primary in a dramatic fashion in a sports arena or large hall — but the count was all done online this time.

Biden actually clinched the nomination in early June. His other challengers in the once-crowded Democratic presidential primary had left the race, and the votes of seven states and the District of Columbia gave him the 1,991 delegates to the convention needed to lock it up.

A former senator from Delaware and vice president, Biden first ran for president in 1988 and tried again in 2008 before launching his 2020 campaign last year.

President Donald Trump faced only token opposition in his party’s primary and will formally be renominated as his party’s candidate during the virtual Republican National Convention next week.

9:45 p.m.

Instead of a traditional roll call vote, where Democrats from each state and territory boast about the place they’re representing and announce how many delegates they have for the nominee, the party is formally nominating Biden with pretaped segments. The roll call will go alphabetically through the 57 states, territories and the Democrats Abroad delegation, meaning Alabama will lead off.

“You’re going to see very iconic symbols of America embodied from every state,” Perez said, calling it one of the week’s highlights.

Alabama led off the roll call from the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, site of the voting rights marches of 1965 and the Bloody Sunday encounter when state troopers beat and nearly killed civil rights icon John Lewis and other marchers. The late congressman, an Alabama native, died in July after representing Georgia in Congress for more than 30 years.

Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell, a Selma native, delivered her delegation’s votes on Biden’s nomination.

9:30 p.m.

Bill Clinton delivered a stinging attack on President Donald Trump, saying the nation knows what he’d do with four more years in the White House: “Blame, bully and belittle.”

The former president addressed the second night of the virtual Democratic National Convention on Tuesday and said Trump “defines the job as spending hours a day watching TV and zapping people on social media.”

Clinton said, “Denying, distracting, and demeaning works great if you’re trying to entertain and inflame. But in a real crisis, it collapses like a house of cards.”

He also praised Democratic candidate Joe Biden but spent far more time on the offensive against Trump, who defeated his wife, Hillary, to clinch the presidency in 2016.

Bill Clinton played a major role in conventions for four decades but was limited to five minutes on Tuesday.

But even abbreviated, his appearance is tricky for Democrats. In the #MeToo era, as the party is focused on overt appeals to female voters, putting Clinton on stage is problematic for Democrats, given the numerous accusations of sexual misconduct against him.

9:25 p.m.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer made a pitch at the Democratic National Convention not just for Joe Biden, but for flipping control of the Senate to Democrats.

Schumer said Tuesday: “If we are going to win this battle for the soul of our nation, Joe can’t do it alone. Democrats must take back the Senate.”

The New York Democrat outlined a potential 2021 agenda on making health care “affordable for all” and tackling income inequality, climate change and other issues, including the COVID-19 crisis.

With the Statue of Liberty as a backdrop, he said President Donald Trump has “demeaned” everything it stands for.

“America, Donald Trump has quit on you,” he said.

“We need a president with dignity, integrity, and the experience to lead us out of this crisis, a man with a steady hand and a big heart who will never — ever — quit on America,” he said. “That man is my friend Joe Biden. He will be a great president.”

9:20 p.m.

Former acting Attorney General Sally Yates says President Donald Trump has “trampled the rule of law” and treats the country like a “family business.”

Yates spoke Tuesday on the second night of the Democratic National Convention.

She said she never expected to be speaking at a convention but the future of the country was at stake. She said Trump’s Democratic opponent, Joe Biden, represented the best of the country and said America needed a president who respected its laws and “would restore the soul of America.”

Yates served as deputy attorney general during the Obama administration and stayed on as acting attorney during the early days of the T acting attorney general in the first days of the Trump administration, when she was fired by the president for refusing to defend the travel ban.

9:10 p.m.

The pageantry often associated with presidential conventions is being remade again as Democrats gather virtually for a second day.

The Tuesday night keynote speech has historically been a star-making opportunity. It’s where a state senator from Illinois named Barack Obama become a household name. It’s also where Julian Castro, then the mayor of San Antonio made his national debut in 2012 before going on to serve in the Obama administration and run for president in 2020.

Instead of giving the speaking slot to one up-and-comer, Democrats divided it up among a diverse group of 17 “rising stars.”

They included Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams, who was considered a contender for Biden’s running mate; Nevada state Sen. Yvanna Cancela, the former political director for the powerful Las Vegas casino workers’ union; Mayor Robert Garcia of Long Beach, California, who became the city’s first openly gay mayor in 2014; Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez; and New Hampshire state Rep. Denny Ruprecht, who became that state’s youngest lawmaker when he was elected in 2018 at age 19.

The roll call vote of state delegations, which typically unfolds over several hours of fanfare, will instead be abbreviated Tuesday.

Though Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez is in Milwaukee, the convention host city, most party and elected officials, activists and musical acts will be appearing from livestreams and pretaped videos from around the country.