LIVE: White House coronavirus task force provides updates; NYC death toll surpasses number killed in 9/11

The latest:There are more than 386,000 cases in the United States, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally.By early Tuesday, the U.S. death toll surpassed 12,000 people.Globally, the number of cases has surpassed 1.4 million with more than 81,000 deaths, Hopkins reports. New York City’s death toll officially eclipsed the number of those killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11, health officials said. France has surpassed 10,000 deaths due to COVID-19.British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is in stable condition after being moved to intensive care when his coronavirus symptoms worsened.Members of Congress and the White House are looking ahead toward another coronavirus rescue package in addition to the $2.2 trillion stimulus package signed by President Donald Trump last month, the Associated Press reported Monday. Trump said he will be asking Congress for an additional $250 billion for a paycheck protection program for businesses and their workers. Wisconsin’s Supreme Court blocked Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’ order to postpone the state’s primary election Tuesday, despite his arguments that in-person voting could endanger poll workers and voters because of the coronavirus pandemic. As the U.S. coronavirus death toll moves past 12,000, health officials say parts of the country that leaned in heavily to social distancing measures may be seeing a slowdown in the growth of coronavirus cases.The majority of people in the U.S. are “doing the right thing” by staying home and following other mitigation measures to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams told ABC’s “Good Morning America” on Tuesday.”I’m seeing mitigation work,” Adams said. “I know I’ve said it a couple times with Washington and with California. Their public health officials there should be applauded because they’ve given us the blueprint for how we deal with this and the rest of the country.”President Donald Trump warned Americans last week to prepare for a “painful” two weeks ahead as he extended nationwide distancing measures and acknowledged the severity of the virus.Both Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading health official and Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said Monday that with continued mitigation efforts, there is potential to lower the projected U.S. death toll from 100,000.”I don’t think anyone has ever mitigated the way I’ve seen people mitigate right now. It’s never happened in this country before. I am optimistic. Always cautiously optimistic,” Fauci said.Meanwhile, an influential University of Washington model now predicts fewer people will die and fewer hospital beds will be needed, compared to its estimates from last week.But it assumes social distancing measures — like closing schools and business — will continue until August.The model predicts the virus may kill more than 81,000 people in the United States over the next four months, with just under 141,000 hospital beds being needed. That’s about 12,000 fewer deaths — and 121,000 fewer hospital beds — than the model estimated on Thursday, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington School of Medicine says.Paris bans daytime outdoor exercises As France surpassed 10,000 deaths due to coronavirus, the mayor of Paris announced a restriction on when citizens would be allowed to exercise outdoors. Anne Hidalgo said between the hours of 10 a.m. and 7 p.m., outdoor exercises would be banned in the French capital. Hidalgo said the rule change came in the hopes of having Parisians exercising “when the streets are generally at their quietest,” according to the BBC.New Jersey closing parks, state forestsThe Garden State is looking to further increase its social distancing efforts.New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Tuesday that he’s signing an executive order to close all state parks and forests as well as county parks.”We’ve seen far too many instances in our parks where people are gathering and socializing in groups. We need to #FlattenTheCurve,” he said on Twitter.New Jersey has had more than 41,000 cases and over 1,000 deaths reported as of Tuesday, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University.New York governor says new deaths were flat for two daysNew York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday the number of coronavirus deaths has been effectively flat for two days, adding that the “total number of hospitalizations are down, ICU admissions are down and the daily intubations are down. Those are all good signs and again would suggest a possible flattening of the curve,” he said.”But we get reckless,” the governor warned, “we change, we’re not compliant on social distancing, you will see those numbers go up again.”New York City’s death toll officially eclipsed the number of those killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11, health officials said Tuesday. At least 3,202 people have died in New York from COVID-19, according to the count released by the city. The deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil killed 2,753 people in the city and 2,977 overall, when hijacked planes slammed into the twin towers, the Pentagon and a Pennsylvania field on Sept. 11, 2001.In Colorado, Gov. Jared Polis extended the state’s stay-at-home order to April 26 and said the state was starting to “see progress” thanks to the measures.”At the beginning of the crisis, the number of positive cases in Colorado was doubling every one and a half days. Today, the number of positive cases is about doubling every six to seven days,” he said. “That means the spread of the virus is beginning to slow.”Los Angeles saw a 7% increase in cases Monday, marking the city’s first single-digit daily increase since mid-March, Mayor Eric Garcetti said.The mayor, while calling the smaller rate of increase “good news,” cautioned that the percentage of increase is usually lower on Mondays than other days of the week.Health officials say the state’s early aggressive measures gave California time to prepare for its peak in cases, which Gov. Gavin Newsom has said will likely come in May.”The governor brought together experts to really try to understand if we flatten our curve, if we do all of this social distancing and stay at home how should we be thinking about what to prepare for, ” California Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis said Monday.The growing number of cases, she said, are expected but come at a pace that has so far allowed the state to prepare.”We have been expanding the capacity of our hospitals rapidly and so far we are able to handle the increase,” she said. “But of course, for California and for all states around the country, it really is a race against time to have the equipment and supplies we need.” States helping each other with supplies To help states like hard-hit New York, California announced it was sending 500 ventilators to the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile, which Trump previously said is nearly depleted.”We still have a long road ahead of us in the Golden State — and we’re aggressively preparing for a surge — but we can’t turn our back on Americans whose lives depend on having a ventilator now,” Newsom said in a statement.The 500 machines were scheduled to leave California on a military aircraft Monday to be shipped to FEMA, which will then redistribute to other states based on need, Brian Ferguson with the California Office of Emergency Services told CNN.Newsom isn’t alone — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee have also offered ventilators to support other states.”These ventilators are going to New York and other states hardest hit by this virus,” Inslee said in a statement Sunday. The governor released 400 ventilators to the national stockpile.”I’ve said many times over the last few weeks: We are in this together,” he said. “This should guide all of our actions at an individual and state level in the coming days and weeks.”Virus hits African-American communitiesMeanwhile, as states employ more tests to identify carriers of the virus, data has begun to show African Americans make up a large number of victims in the country.In Chicago, 72% of the people who have died from coronavirus are black, though they make up 30% of the population, officials said.In Louisiana, where nearly 33% of the population is African American, those residents account for 70% of the state’s coronavirus deaths.Dr. Celine Gounder, a CNN medical analyst and clinical assistant professor of infectious diseases, on Tuesday offered possible reasons for this, including:• African Americans may be disproportionately likely to work in essential jobs that can’t be done at home, such as grocery jobs.• African Americans are disproportionately likely to have underlying health conditions that would make someone more likely to have severe COVID-19 illnesses.Adams, the surgeon general, made similar arguments to “CBS This Morning” on Tuesday.”When you look at being black in America, No. 1, people unfortunately are more likely to be of low socioeconomic status, which makes it harder to social distance. No. 2, we know that blacks are more likely to have diabetes, heart disease, lung disease,” Adams told CBS.”I and many black Americans are at higher risk for Covid. It’s why we need everyone to do their part to slow the spread.”The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law on Monday called for the federal government to release racial and ethnic data relating to the pandemic. The group says it wants to “ensure that communities of color receive equitable health care and treatment during this crisis.”Trump seeks $250 billion more from Congress for payrollsAs Congress races to craft the next coronavirus rescue package, Trump requested Tuesday to pump $250 billion more into a just-launched payroll program for small businesses.Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said more money is needed for the popular new $350 billion Paycheck Protection Program, which took off with a start last Friday but was quickly overrun as companies jumped at the chance to tap up to $10 million in forgivable loans to keep paychecks flowing amid the stay-home shutdown. He requested the funds in private calls to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Democrats largely support it as a component of a broader new aid package, but McConnell wants to swiftly jam it through Congress this week, even though the House and Senate all but shuttered. The House was already preparing to boost the small business program as part of a broader $1 trillion package Pelosi wants as a follow-up to the sweeping $2.2 trillion rescue that became law in late March. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

The latest:

  • There are more than 386,000 cases in the United States, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally.
  • By early Tuesday, the U.S. death toll surpassed 12,000 people.
  • Globally, the number of cases has surpassed 1.4 million with more than 81,000 deaths, Hopkins reports.
  • New York City’s death toll officially eclipsed the number of those killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11, health officials said.
  • France has surpassed 10,000 deaths due to COVID-19.
  • British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is in stable condition after being moved to intensive care when his coronavirus symptoms worsened.
  • Members of Congress and the White House are looking ahead toward another coronavirus rescue package in addition to the $2.2 trillion stimulus package signed by President Donald Trump last month, the Associated Press reported Monday.
  • Trump said he will be asking Congress for an additional $250 billion for a paycheck protection program for businesses and their workers.
  • Wisconsin’s Supreme Court blocked Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’ order to postpone the state’s primary election Tuesday, despite his arguments that in-person voting could endanger poll workers and voters because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Advertisement


As the U.S. coronavirus death toll moves past 12,000, health officials say parts of the country that leaned in heavily to social distancing measures may be seeing a slowdown in the growth of coronavirus cases.

The majority of people in the U.S. are “doing the right thing” by staying home and following other mitigation measures to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams told ABC’s “Good Morning America” on Tuesday.

“I’m seeing mitigation work,” Adams said. “I know I’ve said it a couple times with Washington and with California. Their public health officials there should be applauded because they’ve given us the blueprint for how we deal with this and the rest of the country.”

President Donald Trump warned Americans last week to prepare for a “painful” two weeks ahead as he extended nationwide distancing measures and acknowledged the severity of the virus.

Both Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading health official and Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said Monday that with continued mitigation efforts, there is potential to lower the projected U.S. death toll from 100,000.

“I don’t think anyone has ever mitigated the way I’ve seen people mitigate right now. It’s never happened in this country before. I am optimistic. Always cautiously optimistic,” Fauci said.

Meanwhile, an influential University of Washington model now predicts fewer people will die and fewer hospital beds will be needed, compared to its estimates from last week.

But it assumes social distancing measures — like closing schools and business — will continue until August.

The model predicts the virus may kill more than 81,000 people in the United States over the next four months, with just under 141,000 hospital beds being needed. That’s about 12,000 fewer deaths — and 121,000 fewer hospital beds — than the model estimated on Thursday, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington School of Medicine says.

Paris bans daytime outdoor exercises

As France surpassed 10,000 deaths due to coronavirus, the mayor of Paris announced a restriction on when citizens would be allowed to exercise outdoors.

Anne Hidalgo said between the hours of 10 a.m. and 7 p.m., outdoor exercises would be banned in the French capital.

Hidalgo said the rule change came in the hopes of having Parisians exercising “when the streets are generally at their quietest,” according to the BBC.

New Jersey closing parks, state forests

The Garden State is looking to further increase its social distancing efforts.

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Tuesday that he’s signing an executive order to close all state parks and forests as well as county parks.

“We’ve seen far too many instances in our parks where people are gathering and socializing in groups. We need to #FlattenTheCurve,” he said on Twitter.

New Jersey has had more than 41,000 cases and over 1,000 deaths reported as of Tuesday, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University.

New York governor says new deaths were flat for two days

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday the number of coronavirus deaths has been effectively flat for two days, adding that the “total number of hospitalizations are down, ICU admissions are down and the daily intubations are down. Those are all good signs and again would suggest a possible flattening of the curve,” he said.

“But we get reckless,” the governor warned, “we change, we’re not compliant on social distancing, you will see those numbers go up again.”

New York City’s death toll officially eclipsed the number of those killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11, health officials said Tuesday.

At least 3,202 people have died in New York from COVID-19, according to the count released by the city. The deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil killed 2,753 people in the city and 2,977 overall, when hijacked planes slammed into the twin towers, the Pentagon and a Pennsylvania field on Sept. 11, 2001.

In Colorado, Gov. Jared Polis extended the state’s stay-at-home order to April 26 and said the state was starting to “see progress” thanks to the measures.

“At the beginning of the crisis, the number of positive cases in Colorado was doubling every one and a half days. Today, the number of positive cases is about doubling every six to seven days,” he said. “That means the spread of the virus is beginning to slow.”

Medical personnel are seen outside NYU Langone Health hospital as people applaud to show their gratitude to medical staff and essential workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic on April 6, 2020 in New York City.

Noam Galai / Getty Images

Medical personnel are seen outside NYU Langone Health hospital as people applaud to show their gratitude to medical staff and essential workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic on April 6, 2020 in New York City.


Los Angeles saw a 7% increase in cases Monday, marking the city’s first single-digit daily increase since mid-March, Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

The mayor, while calling the smaller rate of increase “good news,” cautioned that the percentage of increase is usually lower on Mondays than other days of the week.

Health officials say the state’s early aggressive measures gave California time to prepare for its peak in cases, which Gov. Gavin Newsom has said will likely come in May.

“The governor brought together experts to really try to understand if we flatten our curve, if we do all of this social distancing and stay at home how should we be thinking about what to prepare for, ” California Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis said Monday.

The growing number of cases, she said, are expected but come at a pace that has so far allowed the state to prepare.

“We have been expanding the capacity of our hospitals rapidly and so far we are able to handle the increase,” she said. “But of course, for California and for all states around the country, it really is a race against time to have the equipment and supplies we need.”

States helping each other with supplies

To help states like hard-hit New York, California announced it was sending 500 ventilators to the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile, which Trump previously said is nearly depleted.

“We still have a long road ahead of us in the Golden State — and we’re aggressively preparing for a surge — but we can’t turn our back on Americans whose lives depend on having a ventilator now,” Newsom said in a statement.

The 500 machines were scheduled to leave California on a military aircraft Monday to be shipped to FEMA, which will then redistribute to other states based on need, Brian Ferguson with the California Office of Emergency Services told CNN.

Newsom isn’t alone — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee have also offered ventilators to support other states.

“These ventilators are going to New York and other states hardest hit by this virus,” Inslee said in a statement Sunday. The governor released 400 ventilators to the national stockpile.

“I’ve said many times over the last few weeks: We are in this together,” he said. “This should guide all of our actions at an individual and state level in the coming days and weeks.”

Virus hits African-American communities

Meanwhile, as states employ more tests to identify carriers of the virus, data has begun to show African Americans make up a large number of victims in the country.

In Chicago, 72% of the people who have died from coronavirus are black, though they make up 30% of the population, officials said.

In Louisiana, where nearly 33% of the population is African American, those residents account for 70% of the state’s coronavirus deaths.

Dr. Celine Gounder, a CNN medical analyst and clinical assistant professor of infectious diseases, on Tuesday offered possible reasons for this, including:

• African Americans may be disproportionately likely to work in essential jobs that can’t be done at home, such as grocery jobs.

• African Americans are disproportionately likely to have underlying health conditions that would make someone more likely to have severe COVID-19 illnesses.

Adams, the surgeon general, made similar arguments to “CBS This Morning” on Tuesday.

“When you look at being black in America, No. 1, people unfortunately are more likely to be of low socioeconomic status, which makes it harder to social distance. No. 2, we know that blacks are more likely to have diabetes, heart disease, lung disease,” Adams told CBS.

“I and many black Americans are at higher risk for Covid. It’s why we need everyone to do their part to slow the spread.”

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law on Monday called for the federal government to release racial and ethnic data relating to the pandemic. The group says it wants to “ensure that communities of color receive equitable health care and treatment during this crisis.”

Trump seeks $250 billion more from Congress for payrolls

As Congress races to craft the next coronavirus rescue package, Trump requested Tuesday to pump $250 billion more into a just-launched payroll program for small businesses.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said more money is needed for the popular new $350 billion Paycheck Protection Program, which took off with a start last Friday but was quickly overrun as companies jumped at the chance to tap up to $10 million in forgivable loans to keep paychecks flowing amid the stay-home shutdown. He requested the funds in private calls to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Democrats largely support it as a component of a broader new aid package, but McConnell wants to swiftly jam it through Congress this week, even though the House and Senate all but shuttered.

The House was already preparing to boost the small business program as part of a broader $1 trillion package Pelosi wants as a follow-up to the sweeping $2.2 trillion rescue that became law in late March.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.