Maine man turns scrap metal into works of art

Maine man turns scrap metal into works of art

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MAINE – STEVE MINICH TAKES US TO ‘STUDIO J-BONE’ – A DIFFERENT KIND OF GARDEN. (00-04-56) “THIS TURNS OUT TO BE THE CENTERPIECE HERE, THIS IS JUST TITLED SHROOM’ A GIANT MUSHROOM FASHIONED FROM THE BELLYPAN OF A FALLEN WATER TOWER — IT’S THE CENTERPIECE OF JAY SAWYER’S SCULPTURE GARDEN… (00-42-43) “THIS IS TITLED YOU’RE LOOKING OVER A FOUR LEAF CLOVER” HIS PROPERTY IN WARREN SCATTERED STRATEGICALLY WITH SEVERAL DOZEN OF HIS REPURPOSED METAL WORKS.. (00-22-39) “THE MATERIAL HERE BEING THE IRON AND ALL OF MOTHER NATURE AND THE EARTHY COLORS,, IT’S ALL, I GUESS, THAT’S HOW I EXPRESS MYSELF.” BETTER KNOWN THESE DAYS AS THE ARTIST J- BONE,, HIS EYE FOR IRON DATES BACK TO HIS MORE THAN 20-YEAR CAREER AS A COMMERCIAL WELDER…. –NATS OF LIGHTING WELDING TORCH- STILL WIELDING THAT TORCH TODAY,, ,, ONLY AS AN ARTISTIC TOOL — HELPING TO TRANSFORM WHAT MANY MIGHT SEE AS JUST AN OLD PIECE OF WORTHLESS SCRAP — INTO A VALUED SCULPTURE…. — NATS OF WELDING OR POUNDING — (00-22-14) “SO INSTEAD OF SPENDING MONEY ON A NEW MATERIAL TO MAKE A SCULPTURE A LOT OF IT IS IF I’M SEEING BEAUTY IN SOMETHING THAT’S ALREADY SERVED ITS PURPOSE AND IS ABOUT TO BE DISCARDED, AND I CAN SAVE THAT IT JUST MAKES SO MUCH SENCE.” –NATS OF LOOKING THROUGH SCAP– A MASTER RECYCLER,,, OVER THE YEARS J-BONE HAS FORGED HIS OWN SIGNATURE SERIES OF SPHERES AND ABSTRACTS,,,,, MANY OF HIS WORKS NOW ON PUBLIC DISPLAY ACROSS THE STATE…… BUT,, IT’S UPCLOSE THAT YOU GET THE REAL FEEL FOR HIS CRAFT AND EXPRESSION… (00-23-57) “AND THAT’S ONE OF THE BEAUTIES OF THIS WORK IS LOTS OF TIMES WORKING WITH THE MATERIALS THAT PEOPLE ARE FAMILIAR WITH LIKE A HORSESHOE OR A RAILROAD SPIKE (BUTT TO 00-24-26) SO I THINK THIS IS A REAL EASY BRIDGE TO ANYBODY WHETHER YOU’RE A HUGE FAN OF ART OR NOT.” YEARS AGO JAY SAWYER THE METAL FABRICATOR LEARNED THAT THE WORLD CREATES A LOT OF DEBRIS,,,,, TODAY,, AS J-BONE THE ARTIST,, ALL THOSE REMNANTS HAVE PURPOSE… (00-21-53) “I LOVE THIS STUFF,, IT TELLS A STORY, THE PATENA, THE WHOLE EFFECT, THE EXPRESSION OF IT, BRINGING THAT HISTORY WITH IT, I THINK THERE’S SO MUCH THERE.” BY THE WAY – SAWYER IS A GRADUATE OF THE MAINE MARITIME ACADEMY. ONE OF HIS NEW PROJECTS WILL REMEMBER THE SCHOOL’S ALUMNI WHO DIED ABORD THE EL FARO… THE

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Maine man turns scrap metal into works of art

Most people might see an old beat up piece of metal as scrap, but one Maine man sees his next work of art.Jay Sawyer, who is known as the artist JBone, has turned his property in Warren into a metal sculpture garden.”The material here, being the iron and all of mother nature and the earthy colors, it’s all, I guess, that’s how I express myself,” Sawyer said.Sawyer’s eye for metal dates back to his more than 20-year career as a commercial welder.He now transforms an old piece of worthless scrap into a valued sculpture.”So instead of spending money on a new material to make a sculpture, a lot of it is if I’m seeing beauty in something that’s already served its purpose and is about to be discarded, and I can save that, it just makes so much sense,” Sawyer said. Over the years. Sawyer has forged his own signature series of spheres and abstracts. Many of his works are on public display across Maine.“That’s one of the beauties of this work is lots of times working with the materials that people are familiar with, like a horseshoe or a railroad spike. So, I think this is a real easy bridge to anybody, whether you’re a huge fan of art or not,” Sawyer said.Sawyer is a graduate of Maine Maritime Academy, and one of his new projects will remember fellow alumni who died on the cargo ship El Faro. It sank off the coast of Florida in 2015 during Hurricane Joaquin.

Most people might see an old beat up piece of metal as scrap, but one Maine man sees his next work of art.

Jay Sawyer, who is known as the artist JBone, has turned his property in Warren into a metal sculpture garden.

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“The material here, being the iron and all of mother nature and the earthy colors, it’s all, I guess, that’s how I express myself,” Sawyer said.

Sawyer’s eye for metal dates back to his more than 20-year career as a commercial welder.

He now transforms an old piece of worthless scrap into a valued sculpture.

“So instead of spending money on a new material to make a sculpture, a lot of it is if I’m seeing beauty in something that’s already served its purpose and is about to be discarded, and I can save that, it just makes so much sense,” Sawyer said.

Over the years. Sawyer has forged his own signature series of spheres and abstracts. Many of his works are on public display across Maine.

“That’s one of the beauties of this work is lots of times working with the materials that people are familiar with, like a horseshoe or a railroad spike. So, I think this is a real easy bridge to anybody, whether you’re a huge fan of art or not,” Sawyer said.

Sawyer is a graduate of Maine Maritime Academy, and one of his new projects will remember fellow alumni who died on the cargo ship El Faro. It sank off the coast of Florida in 2015 during Hurricane Joaquin.