Maine woman creates varied works of art using repurposed materials

Maine woman creates varied works of art using repurposed materials

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DUNN,,, HERE’S STEVE MINICH WITH THIS WEEK’S…. MADE IN MAINE… — QUICK NATS (00-12- 28) OF LOOM– –NATS (00-15-52) OF HAND ON PAPER- –NATS (00-17- 48) OF CHAINSAW STARTING– (00-24-33 “I USUALLY SAY, WELL, I’M ALL OVER THE PLACE AND IT’S ACTUALLY TRUE.” SAFE TO SAY LAURA DUNN’S ARTWORK SPANS A WIDE SPECTRUM…. (00-24-39) “PART OF THE REASON IS I JUST ADORE PLAYING AND I ADORE EXPERIMENTING.” FROM THE TINIEST OF POTTERY — TO HER TALL SCULPTURES — FROM WEAVING — WEILDING A CHAINSAW,,,,, WHATEVER THE PIECE,,, LAURA LOVES THE CHALLENGE OF WAKING UP EACH MORNING AND WONDERING WHICH OF HER TASKS SHE’LL TACKLE. (00-28-10) “IT REALLY IS INTUITIVE AND SOMEDAYS IT JUST DOESN’T HAPPEN BUT OTHER DAYS YOU COULD JUST GO ALL TRUDGING THROUGH THE WOODS IN SEARCH OF A FALLEN TREE T CARVE A TOTEM POLE,,,, THE NEXT,, SPENDING HOURS SITTING STILL,, WORKING METICULOUSLY ON MINITURE POTS,,,,, SOME OF THEM NO LARGER THAN A FINGERNAIL… (00-06-24) “SO I CAN JUST SIT FOR HOURS AND JUST MAKE THESE AND EVERYONE IS COMPLETLY DIFFERENT. –NATS OF WORKING– STILL,, FOR ALL THAT’S SO DISTINCTIVLY DIFFERENT WITH LAURA’S WORKS… (00-16-35) “YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO GET.” ,,,,,, THERE IS ONE SIGNIFICANT SIMILARITY,, NO MATTER THE PAINTING,, NO MATTER THE CARVING — OR PLASTIC TAPESTRY… (00-10-03) “THIS IS PLASTIC BAGS, IT’S HANAFORD, IT’S HOME DEPOT..” IT’S ALL ABOUT REPURPOSING MATERIALS… —NATS OF WEAVING— (00-26-42) “NOTHING GOES JUST STRAIGHT FROM ME TO THE TRASH,, IT ALWAYS HAS A PATHWAY AND IF I’M NOT MAKING SOMETHING OUT OF IT I’M USING IT FOR SOMETHING ELSE.” LAURA WORKS ON A SIMPLE PREMISE,,,, OBSERVE, COLLECT, REPURPOSE AND MAKE…… EXACTLY WHAT SHE MAKES MIGHT DEPEND ON HER MOOD THAT DAY BUT NO MATTER HOW CONTRASTING HER WORK — THE MESSAGE IS IDENTICAL… (00-26-15) “USING WHAT IS AT HAND, TRYING NOT TO HAVE THINGS GO INTO THE WASTE STREAM (BUTT TO 00-2

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Maine woman creates varied works of art using repurposed materials

While most artists choose one or two mediums for their work, one Maine artist’s work spans a wide spectrum.“Part of the reason is I just adore playing, and I adore experimenting,” artist Laura Dunn said.From pottery to weaving and wielding a chainsaw, Dunn said she loves the challenge of waking up each morning and wondering why she will tackle.”It really is intuitive, and somedays it just doesn’t happen but other days you could just go all day long,” Dunn said.One day she might be trudging through the woods in search of a fallen tree to carve a totem pole. The next day she might spend hours sitting still, working meticulously on miniature pots.”So, I can just sit for hours and just make these, and everyone is completely different,” Dunn said.For all that is distinctively different about Dunn’s work, there is one significant similarity, no matter the carving or plastic tapestry.”This is plastic bags. It’s Hanaford. It’s Home Depot,” Dunn said.Her work is about repurposing materials.”Nothing goes just straight from me to the trash. It always has a pathway, and if I’m not making something out of it, I’m using it for something else,” Dunn said.She works through a simple premise: observe, collect, repurpose and make.Exactly what Dunn makes might depend on her mood on a given day, but no matter how contrasting her work is, the message is identical.”Using what is at hand, trying not to have things go into the waste stream, finding beauty in the mundane, it’s very, very important to me,” Dunn said.Dunn features her wide array of works on her website.

While most artists choose one or two mediums for their work, one Maine artist’s work spans a wide spectrum.

“Part of the reason is I just adore playing, and I adore experimenting,” artist Laura Dunn said.

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From pottery to weaving and wielding a chainsaw, Dunn said she loves the challenge of waking up each morning and wondering why she will tackle.

“It really is intuitive, and somedays it just doesn’t happen but other days you could just go all day long,” Dunn said.

One day she might be trudging through the woods in search of a fallen tree to carve a totem pole. The next day she might spend hours sitting still, working meticulously on miniature pots.

“So, I can just sit for hours and just make these, and everyone is completely different,” Dunn said.

For all that is distinctively different about Dunn’s work, there is one significant similarity, no matter the carving or plastic tapestry.

“This is plastic bags. It’s Hanaford. It’s Home Depot,” Dunn said.

Her work is about repurposing materials.

“Nothing goes just straight from me to the trash. It always has a pathway, and if I’m not making something out of it, I’m using it for something else,” Dunn said.

She works through a simple premise: observe, collect, repurpose and make.

Exactly what Dunn makes might depend on her mood on a given day, but no matter how contrasting her work is, the message is identical.

“Using what is at hand, trying not to have things go into the waste stream, finding beauty in the mundane, it’s very, very important to me,” Dunn said.

Dunn features her wide array of works on her website.