Maine youth sports programs prepare for a different summer season

The sports world has been all but shut down by the coronavirus outbreak. Gov. Janet Mills’ plan to slowly reopen the state could allow some sports teams to start playing by the end of the summer, with some significant changes. That includes for youth sports.Organizers for local youth sports programs say the kids just want to get back to playing. Baseball seems to be most likely to resume activity.Competitive club programs that usually travel out of state for competitions will likely have to change their plans. “Once that June 1 date comes around, if we can get together with some different organizations in state, that’s a win-win for everybody at this point,” said Ryan Copp, co-owner of Edge Academy.”We’ve got two plans,” added Andrew Pelletier, club director for Seacoast United. “One that we think is a very long shot, going out of state. So the one we focus most of our attention on is doing in-state stuff.”Not all sports will be able to return to play at the same time. Games like basketball, with frequent contact in indoor facilities, likely puts it at a disadvantage.When sports programs are allowed to resume play, they may not be allowed to have fans and baseball dugouts with their current design may become a thing of the past.

The sports world has been all but shut down by the coronavirus outbreak.

Gov. Janet Mills’ plan to slowly reopen the state could allow some sports teams to start playing by the end of the summer, with some significant changes. That includes for youth sports.

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Organizers for local youth sports programs say the kids just want to get back to playing. Baseball seems to be most likely to resume activity.

Competitive club programs that usually travel out of state for competitions will likely have to change their plans.

“Once that June 1 date comes around, if we can get together with some different organizations in state, that’s a win-win for everybody at this point,” said Ryan Copp, co-owner of Edge Academy.

“We’ve got two plans,” added Andrew Pelletier, club director for Seacoast United. “One that we think is a very long shot, going out of state. So the one we focus most of our attention on is doing in-state stuff.”

Not all sports will be able to return to play at the same time. Games like basketball, with frequent contact in indoor facilities, likely puts it at a disadvantage.

When sports programs are allowed to resume play, they may not be allowed to have fans and baseball dugouts with their current design may become a thing of the past.