National coronavirus updates: Most alarming case numbers in some states in prisons and nursing homes

for Eva Betancourt. The wait lasted 48 hours. I just flipped out like, How does this happen? That’s how long until she’d find out of the tests given to her 81 year old mother, Arnoldo, by this Boston area nursing home would be positive for Kobe. 19 48 hours, two days. It was the worst. I couldn’t focus. The Corona virus test came back positive. Another show, Pneumonia. Arnaldo went to the hospital hours after 13 days later, at 7 39 in the morning, the woman who immigrated to the U. S from Portugal and raised four kids took her last breath. In Eva’s view, the home did not do enough in my soul. In my heart, I believe this was not her time to go. My anger, my rage, was directed completely and still is to the nursing home facility that she was at because they did not protect her. That was their duty. Brentwood rehabilitation and Health Care Center, we’ve learned, is one of dozens of long term care facilities nationwide singled out in the past few weeks for Kobe. 19 focus inspections on behalf of federal regulators. It past the 1 March 31st after being cited for infection control problems in each of the past two years. In a statement, the home told us 13 of its residents have died of Kobe 19 but that it has quote never wavered from our commitment to protect and care for our residents. We meet or exceed all federal and state health guidelines. I thought it would have been the best thing for her, and unfortunately, it turned out that it wasn’t in all. The National investigative unit obtained and reviewed hundreds of pages of new Preliminary Cove in 19 focused inspection reports. They spanned 181 facilities in 22 states. Since March, inspectors working on behalf of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services found infection control deficiencies in nearly one out of every four eight homes put residents in immediate jeopardy of Contracting Cove in 19 inspectors found in Seattle a lack of staff protection in Chicago, no social distancing and in Miami, failing to take safety precautions after a resident tested positive. That home is Golden Glades Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Miami, where his reported three Kobe deaths. Corona virus patients are now isolated on its fourth floor working there. It’s rough, but somebody needs to do the work. This aide, who works there on another floor agreed to speak to us if we concealed her identity and changed her voice. Yes, you are scared. Would you have to have faith, lots of mistakes by lots of people and lots of fundamental mistakes. Toby Edelman with the Center for Medicare Advocacy review the inspection reports for us and found a common theme. Not washing their hands, not changing their gloves, not not disinfecting medical equipment between residents. Very basic longstanding requirements Still making the same mistakes. What happens if those things aren’t fixed? The consequences for residents we know can be life threatening. Are you saying if these problems aren’t fixed, that people could die, People could die. People are dying. CMS has sent this noticed estates, ordering even Mork over 19 inspections. The agency tells us it is now scheduled 7000 to eventually be completed. The head of CMS spoke to us in a brief interview. We want to assess nursing homes across the country for infection for all, and we’ve actually used all our resource is to do that to serve a process that is punitive. That is not helpful. Mark Parkinson’s association represents 14,000 nursing homes. He says they need more government provided testing supplies and money. Why are some nursing homes not doing mawr to protect their residents? If the thought is that if these folks were washing their hands a little bit longer or changing lives a little bit more, that that would have stopped this. That’s just simply ignoring the vicious nature of this virus. The battle is in nursing homes, and we had been treated as second class citizens are. Call now is for the country to rally around nursing homes the same way that it did around hospitals. By one measure, long term care residents now make up one out of every four cove in 19 deaths, a staggering toll. This is her life that includes Eva Betancourt’s mother. It’s insane. There is no reason for this. It should not have happened this way. In Washington, I’m chief national investigative correspondent Mark Albert

Advertisement

National coronavirus updates: Most alarming case numbers in some states in prisons and nursing homes

The latest:There have been more than 1.2 million coronavirus cases in the United States, according to the Johns Hopkins University tally.The U.S. death toll has surpassed 73,000 people, according to Hopkins. Federal stimulus payments sent to people who have died must be returned, the Internal Revenue Service said in new guidance released Wednesday.The Pentagon is considering banning new recruits from joining the military if they have been hospitalized for the coronavirus unless they get a waiver from the service they want to sign up with, according to a defense official.More than 40 public companies are pledging to return money to the government’s small business coronavirus fund — now that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is threatening criminal prosecutions for violating the rules of the program.President Donald Trump on Wednesday reversed course on plans to wind down his COVID-19 task force, attempting to balance his enthusiasm for reopening the country with rising infection rates in parts of the nation.As coronavirus restrictions in the U.S. are loosened, public health officials and state leaders have urged residents to continue practicing social distancing in order to prevent another spike in cases.But Americans in prisons and nursing homes often don’t have that option. In some states, those facilities make up a startling number of coronavirus cases.Across federal and state prisons, thousands of inmates have tested positive for the virus — many of whom showed no symptoms when they were infected. In Ohio, more than 20% of the people infected with coronavirus are prisoners. And in Colorado, the state’s largest outbreak is in a correctional facility.The numbers are similarly harrowing in nursing homes and are facilities across the country.In Louisiana, more than 30% of the state’s coronavirus deaths are nursing home residents. In New Hampshire, long-term care facility residents make up nearly 80% of the state’s cases.”Nursing homes have been ground zero for COVID-19,” Seema Verma, the administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said last month.Officials across states have pushed to ramp up testing in both correctional facilities and nursing homes in hopes of catching up to the widespread numbers as family members stuck outside and separated from their loved ones wait for updates.In one state, half of all cases are in prisons and nursing homesIn Arkansas, almost half of all of the state’s cases are in prisons and nursing homes.More than 1,000 inmates have tested positive for the virus, according to Dr. Nate Smith, the Director of the Arkansas Department of Health, and 876 of them are in a single correctional facility.A total of 261 nursing home residents and 148 staff members have also been infected, with at least 32 deaths in the state connected to the facilities.Arkansas has reported a total of 3,611 cases and 87 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University. And in Ohio, people behind bars make up 20% of the state’s total infections.More than 4,300 inmates have tested positive for the virus in total, according to data from the state’s department of corrections. Ohio has recorded at least 21,576 cases of the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University.More than 2,100 Ohio inmates are currently positive — 1,353 of whom are housed in a single facility, according to the corrections department data. At least 40 inmates have died.More than 480 staff members are also positive and two have died.”The reason that you are seeing numbers out of our prisons, that are much, much higher than other places is because we made a decision to go test everybody. And when we’ve got a hotspot we move in and we’ve surged testing in,” Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said late last month.Largest outbreak in Colorado is a prisonIn Colorado, the state’s largest hotspot is the Sterling Correctional Facility, which according to state data has reported 262 positive results — about 10% of the facility’s total inmate population.Corrections officials tested more than 400 inmates last month after eight were initially found to be infected.”Given the insidious nature of this virus, we had suspected that despite seeing a relatively low number of inmates with symptoms, the number of positives was potentially much higher,” Department of Corrections Executive Director Dean Williams said when the widespread testing was first ordered in late April.In a news release this month, the state’s department of corrections said that since mid-April inmates in the facility have been required to remain in their cells and can only leave to use the restroom or shower. Meals and medications are also delivered to the living units.The next largest outbreak, with 84 cases, is also a prison in Denver.Colorado has reported more than 17,830 cases and at least 919 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.80% of New Hampshire deaths in nursing homes New Hampshire Health Commissioner Lori Shibinette said Wednesday that while the state has begun seeing its community transmission, illness rates and hospitalizations start to level out or decline, the trend has not been the same in long-term care facilities.”Based on our numbers in long-term care to date, we took some very aggressive action early on, and I think at this point it’s time to take further steps to address some of the long-term care testing issues,” Shibinette said. “To date, we have tested over 1,000 nursing home residents across the state, which is a great number. We want to test more.”About 111 people have died in New Hampshire — 78% of whom were people associated with long-term care facility outbreaks, Shibinette said.”I’m upset,” said Andrew Delisle, whose mom died in one of the state’s nursing homes, he told our sister station WMUR.”Do I think it could’ve been prevented? Probably. Would it have been inevitable? The way things have spread and the way things are going on, it may have. I think there’s going to be a lot of soul searching.”Shibinette said the state was rolling out a new plan for long-term care facilities in which, every week, the state will randomly select about 10% of its facilities and ask for swabs from 10% of the residents. The state’s goal is to offer testing to all long-term care and nursing home staff members every seven to 10 days.In Louisiana, more than 30% of the state’s deaths come from nursing home residents.On Monday, the Louisiana Department of Health reported that 688 nursing home residents had died and an additional 50 deaths were reported among residents of other adult residential facilities.Louisiana has recorded 30,399 cases and 2,167 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.Half of New Jersey deaths in long-term care facilitiesNew Jersey’s care facilities have also been hard hit.More than 50% of the state’s deaths come from long-term care facilities, according to data posted by the New Jersey Department of Health. On Monday, Gov. Phil Murphy said he spoke with the National Guard over the possibility of using non-medical members to assist nursing homes.Those duties will include taking on janitorial, kitchen, security, logistics and general purpose roles, state officials said.”We’re asking for medical assistance, and that they would work under a registered nurse or a licensed practical nurse, help with site testing, janitorial, cooking, meal service, family communication, administrative work, security, logistics, such as making sure that supplies and equipment are where they need to be, and then general purpose,” Commissioner of Health Judith Persichilli said Monday. “We’ve been on the phone and working with the General and his team all weekend and throughout today, so we hope to have something more positive in the next several days, but they’ve been more than wanting to help out. It’s just to make sure that we put them in the right spots,” Persichilli added.

The latest:

  • There have been more than 1.2 million coronavirus cases in the United States, according to the Johns Hopkins University tally.
  • The U.S. death toll has surpassed 73,000 people, according to Hopkins.
  • Federal stimulus payments sent to people who have died must be returned, the Internal Revenue Service said in new guidance released Wednesday.
  • The Pentagon is considering banning new recruits from joining the military if they have been hospitalized for the coronavirus unless they get a waiver from the service they want to sign up with, according to a defense official.
  • More than 40 public companies are pledging to return money to the government’s small business coronavirus fund — now that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is threatening criminal prosecutions for violating the rules of the program.
  • President Donald Trump on Wednesday reversed course on plans to wind down his COVID-19 task force, attempting to balance his enthusiasm for reopening the country with rising infection rates in parts of the nation.

Advertisement


As coronavirus restrictions in the U.S. are loosened, public health officials and state leaders have urged residents to continue practicing social distancing in order to prevent another spike in cases.

But Americans in prisons and nursing homes often don’t have that option. In some states, those facilities make up a startling number of coronavirus cases.

Across federal and state prisons, thousands of inmates have tested positive for the virus — many of whom showed no symptoms when they were infected. In Ohio, more than 20% of the people infected with coronavirus are prisoners. And in Colorado, the state’s largest outbreak is in a correctional facility.

The numbers are similarly harrowing in nursing homes and are facilities across the country.

In Louisiana, more than 30% of the state’s coronavirus deaths are nursing home residents. In New Hampshire, long-term care facility residents make up nearly 80% of the state’s cases.

“Nursing homes have been ground zero for COVID-19,” Seema Verma, the administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said last month.

Officials across states have pushed to ramp up testing in both correctional facilities and nursing homes in hopes of catching up to the widespread numbers as family members stuck outside and separated from their loved ones wait for updates.

In one state, half of all cases are in prisons and nursing homes

In Arkansas, almost half of all of the state’s cases are in prisons and nursing homes.

More than 1,000 inmates have tested positive for the virus, according to Dr. Nate Smith, the Director of the Arkansas Department of Health, and 876 of them are in a single correctional facility.

A total of 261 nursing home residents and 148 staff members have also been infected, with at least 32 deaths in the state connected to the facilities.

Arkansas has reported a total of 3,611 cases and 87 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

And in Ohio, people behind bars make up 20% of the state’s total infections.

More than 4,300 inmates have tested positive for the virus in total, according to data from the state’s department of corrections. Ohio has recorded at least 21,576 cases of the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University.

More than 2,100 Ohio inmates are currently positive — 1,353 of whom are housed in a single facility, according to the corrections department data. At least 40 inmates have died.

More than 480 staff members are also positive and two have died.

“The reason that you are seeing numbers out of our prisons, that are much, much higher than other places is because we made a decision to go test everybody. And when we’ve got a hotspot we move in and we’ve surged testing in,” Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said late last month.

Largest outbreak in Colorado is a prison

In Colorado, the state’s largest hotspot is the Sterling Correctional Facility, which according to state data has reported 262 positive results — about 10% of the facility’s total inmate population.

Corrections officials tested more than 400 inmates last month after eight were initially found to be infected.

“Given the insidious nature of this virus, we had suspected that despite seeing a relatively low number of inmates with symptoms, the number of positives was potentially much higher,” Department of Corrections Executive Director Dean Williams said when the widespread testing was first ordered in late April.

In a news release this month, the state’s department of corrections said that since mid-April inmates in the facility have been required to remain in their cells and can only leave to use the restroom or shower. Meals and medications are also delivered to the living units.

The next largest outbreak, with 84 cases, is also a prison in Denver.

Colorado has reported more than 17,830 cases and at least 919 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

80% of New Hampshire deaths in nursing homes

New Hampshire Health Commissioner Lori Shibinette said Wednesday that while the state has begun seeing its community transmission, illness rates and hospitalizations start to level out or decline, the trend has not been the same in long-term care facilities.

“Based on our numbers in long-term care to date, we took some very aggressive action early on, and I think at this point it’s time to take further steps to address some of the long-term care testing issues,” Shibinette said. “To date, we have tested over 1,000 nursing home residents across the state, which is a great number. We want to test more.”

About 111 people have died in New Hampshire — 78% of whom were people associated with long-term care facility outbreaks, Shibinette said.

“I’m upset,” said Andrew Delisle, whose mom died in one of the state’s nursing homes, he told our sister station WMUR.

“Do I think it could’ve been prevented? Probably. Would it have been inevitable? The way things have spread and the way things are going on, it may have. I think there’s going to be a lot of soul searching.”

Shibinette said the state was rolling out a new plan for long-term care facilities in which, every week, the state will randomly select about 10% of its facilities and ask for swabs from 10% of the residents. The state’s goal is to offer testing to all long-term care and nursing home staff members every seven to 10 days.

In Louisiana, more than 30% of the state’s deaths come from nursing home residents.

On Monday, the Louisiana Department of Health reported that 688 nursing home residents had died and an additional 50 deaths were reported among residents of other adult residential facilities.

Louisiana has recorded 30,399 cases and 2,167 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Half of New Jersey deaths in long-term care facilities

New Jersey’s care facilities have also been hard hit.

More than 50% of the state’s deaths come from long-term care facilities, according to data posted by the New Jersey Department of Health.

On Monday, Gov. Phil Murphy said he spoke with the National Guard over the possibility of using non-medical members to assist nursing homes.

Those duties will include taking on janitorial, kitchen, security, logistics and general purpose roles, state officials said.

“We’re asking for medical assistance, and that they would work under a registered nurse or a licensed practical nurse, help with site testing, janitorial, cooking, meal service, family communication, administrative work, security, logistics, such as making sure that supplies and equipment are where they need to be, and then general purpose,” Commissioner of Health Judith Persichilli said Monday.

“We’ve been on the phone and working with the General and his team all weekend and throughout today, so we hope to have something more positive in the next several days, but they’ve been more than wanting to help out. It’s just to make sure that we put them in the right spots,” Persichilli added.