National coronavirus updates: President Trump says he will temporarily suspend immigration into US

The latest:There have been more than 786,000 coronavirus cases in the United States, according to the Johns Hopkins University tally.The U.S. death toll has surpassed 42,000 people, according to Hopkins.Globally, there have been more than 2.4 million cases with more than 170,000 deaths. President Donald Trump says a deal on additional funding for small businesses could happen Monday. Governors of some states have started detailing plans to reopen, while other states have extended existing stay-at-home orders.President Trump said during a briefing Sunday that he’ll invoke the Defense Production Act to increase the manufacturing of swabs used to test for coronavirus, according to the Associated Press.President Trump says he will temporarily suspend immigration into the U.S.President Trump says he will temporarily suspend immigration into USPresident Donald Trump said Monday that he will sign an executive order to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States.The president made the announcement in a tweet on Monday.He said it is in response to the coronavirus outbreak and the need to protect jobs.”In light of the attack from the Invisible Enemy, as well as the need to protect the jobs of our GREAT American Citizens, I will be signing an Executive Order to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States!” Trump said.Trump and Pelosi hint deal is close on bailout legislationPresident Donald Trump suggested today that there could be a Senate vote on a supplemental small business package Tuesday. “Hopefully, tomorrow the Senate’s going to be able to vote. A lot of progress has been made on that, tremendous progress, great plan,” Trump said.“We hope to have a vote, maybe tomorrow, in the Senate,” he reiterated. Trump said his administration is pushing for an additional $75 billion for hospitals and other health care providers in the deal.The Senate will try to pass a deal as soon as tomorrow afternoon, according to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.Sources tell CNN House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told House Democrats that a deal could be reached as soon as tonight and said if there’s a deal tonight, the vote in the House will be Wednesday. If the deal comes together Tuesday, she said, the House vote will be Thursday. Protesters push for reopeningIt’s the question on the minds of Americans everywhere: When will this all be over?As it stands in this coronavirus pandemic, the answer remains entirely unclear. Health experts have said the United States needs to rapidly increase its ability to test people for the virus in order to safely reopen without sparking a new wave of infections. Many governors have asked the federal government — which has refused to take responsibility for shortages — to help ramp up that testing capability.Still, some Americans, fed up with more than a month of lockdowns, restrictions and widespread unemployment, have begun pushing for an immediate reopening in protests around the country.The protesters have accused Republican and Democratic governors and public health officials of limiting their “liberty” and “freedom” with government restrictions intended to stop the rapidly spreading illness from moving through communities and overwhelming hospitals.In Denver, the protests led a small group of health care workers to stand in front of their cars as a form of counterprotest. The government’s restrictions have so far slowed — but not stopped — the virus. For example, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that the state has passed the peak of its outbreak. Even so, 500 people died and more than 1,300 people were newly hospitalized with COVID-19 just on Sunday.”We can control the beast, yes, but the beast is still alive,” he said. “We did not kill the beast. And the beast can rise up again.”Brazil’s Bolsonaro defends participating in anti-quarantine rallyBrazilian President Jair Bolsonaro defended his participation in a weekend rally, where protesters called for an end to quarantine measures and urged military intervention to shut down Congress and the Supreme Court. Bolsonaro told reporters Monday he personally did not call for shutting down any branch of the government, adding that Brazil is a democracy and referring to the Supreme Court and Congress as “open and transparent.”He also lashed out at the media, saying he will not “accept provocations by the press.”National and local governments in Brazil have issued mixed messages on how to behave during the pandemic. While Bolsonaro has been pushing against strict restrictions, state and local governments in some of the country’s hardest-hit areas have closed schools and nonessential businesses, with firefighters and police in the streets urging people to stay indoors. Brazil has the most confirmed coronavirus cases in Latin America. As of Sunday, Brazil reported 38,654 cases and 2,462 deaths, according to health officials. Italy’s coronavirus case count decreases for the first timeThe number of active COVID-19 cases in Italy has decreased for the first time since the beginning of the crisis, according to figures released by Italy’s Civil Protection Agency.On Monday there were 108,237 active cases in Italy, down from 108,257 on Sunday. Dr. Fauci says reopening too quickly will backfireThe top infectious-disease expert in the United States has a message for protesters who are ignoring their governors’ stay-at-home orders and calling for him to be fired over his guidelines.Dr. Anthony Fauci says the message is “this is something that is hurting from the standpoint of economics, from the standpoint of things that have nothing to do with the virus.”He added on ABC’s “Good Morning America” that “unless we get the virus under control, the real recovery economically is not gonna happen. So what you do if you jump the gun and go into a situation where you have a big spike, you’re gonna set yourself back.”Fauci says as painful as it is to follow guidelines of gradually phasing into a reopening “it’s gonna backfire. That’s the problem.”Video above: An exclusive interview with Dr. Fauci Some states may announce plans to lift restrictions this weekAs many governors across the U.S. say coronavirus testing is far from full capacity, a few states may lift restrictions this week.Announcements of lifting restrictions come as the United States’ coronavirus death toll topped 40,000 on Sunday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Several regional groups of states have discussed strategies to reopen with each other.On Monday, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster is expected to announce orders that will lift restrictions on beach, river and lakefront access as well as allow shoppers to return to retail site to purchase jewelry, clothing, and furniture, according to a report from The Post and Courier.Despite the expected reopening of some sectors of South Carolina, a coalition of coastal towns in the Charleston area said in a joint statement Sunday that they will continue to limit access to non residents and monitor travel within their jurisdictions.Other states are working on plans to reopen following the release of guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.The guidance suggests that states expand their testing capacity but some say they need more supplies and staff to do so. States want testing capacities expanded Over the weekend, President Trump said governors across the country had the capacity to complete more testing but weren’t utilizing their resources properly.”They don’t want to use all of the capacity that we’ve created. We have tremendous capacity,” Trump said during a briefing at the White House. “They know that. The governors know that. The Democrat governors know that. They’re the ones that are complaining.”Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam called the President’s comments “delusional.”Northam said he wants to see at least two weeks of tending numbers of coronavirus cases decreasing before businesses in his state reopen.”We want to make sure we’re doing it responsibly and we’re doing it safely,” the democratic governor of Virginia told CNN’s Jake Tapper on The State of the Union.”We’ve been fighting for testing, it’s not a straightforward test. We don’t even have enough swabs, believe it or not,” Gov. Northam said.President Trump said during a briefing Sunday that he’ll invoke the Defense Production Act to increase the manufacturing of swabs, according to the Associated Press. The swabs will be used to test for coronavirus.”Our testing is expanding very rapidly by millions and millions of people,” Trump said during the briefing, according to CNN.Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan also told CNN’s Jake Tapper that Trump’s claim that governors have plenty of tests and simply aren’t doing their job “absolutely false.”Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker gave similar remarks Sunday. He said he wants things to be reopen so residents can enjoy recreation this summer but said they need to listen to scientists and doctors investigating the virus before they can comfortably and safely reopen businesses to the public.In order to safely do so, the state needs more lab technicians, more reagent and more RNA extractors to analyze specimens taken, Pritzker said.Harvard researchers warned that if the country wants the economy to open back up — and stay that way — testing must go up to at least 500,000 people per day.Testing nationwide is currently at 150,000 per day, they said, adding that “If we can’t be doing at least 500,000 tests a day by May 1, it is hard to see any way we can remain open.” The Associated Press contributed to this report.

The latest:

  • There have been more than 786,000 coronavirus cases in the United States, according to the Johns Hopkins University tally.
  • The U.S. death toll has surpassed 42,000 people, according to Hopkins.
  • Globally, there have been more than 2.4 million cases with more than 170,000 deaths.
  • President Donald Trump says a deal on additional funding for small businesses could happen Monday.
  • Governors of some states have started detailing plans to reopen, while other states have extended existing stay-at-home orders.
  • President Trump said during a briefing Sunday that he’ll invoke the Defense Production Act to increase the manufacturing of swabs used to test for coronavirus, according to the Associated Press.
  • President Trump says he will temporarily suspend immigration into the U.S.

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President Trump says he will temporarily suspend immigration into US

President Donald Trump said Monday that he will sign an executive order to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States.

The president made the announcement in a tweet on Monday.

He said it is in response to the coronavirus outbreak and the need to protect jobs.

“In light of the attack from the Invisible Enemy, as well as the need to protect the jobs of our GREAT American Citizens, I will be signing an Executive Order to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States!” Trump said.

Trump and Pelosi hint deal is close on bailout legislation

President Donald Trump suggested today that there could be a Senate vote on a supplemental small business package Tuesday.

“Hopefully, tomorrow the Senate’s going to be able to vote. A lot of progress has been made on that, tremendous progress, great plan,” Trump said.

“We hope to have a vote, maybe tomorrow, in the Senate,” he reiterated.

Trump said his administration is pushing for an additional $75 billion for hospitals and other health care providers in the deal.

The Senate will try to pass a deal as soon as tomorrow afternoon, according to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Sources tell CNN House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told House Democrats that a deal could be reached as soon as tonight and said if there’s a deal tonight, the vote in the House will be Wednesday. If the deal comes together Tuesday, she said, the House vote will be Thursday.

Protesters push for reopening

It’s the question on the minds of Americans everywhere: When will this all be over?

As it stands in this coronavirus pandemic, the answer remains entirely unclear. Health experts have said the United States needs to rapidly increase its ability to test people for the virus in order to safely reopen without sparking a new wave of infections. Many governors have asked the federal government — which has refused to take responsibility for shortages — to help ramp up that testing capability.

Still, some Americans, fed up with more than a month of lockdowns, restrictions and widespread unemployment, have begun pushing for an immediate reopening in protests around the country.

The protesters have accused Republican and Democratic governors and public health officials of limiting their “liberty” and “freedom” with government restrictions intended to stop the rapidly spreading illness from moving through communities and overwhelming hospitals.

In Denver, the protests led a small group of health care workers to stand in front of their cars as a form of counterprotest. The government’s restrictions have so far slowed — but not stopped — the virus. For example, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that the state has passed the peak of its outbreak. Even so, 500 people died and more than 1,300 people were newly hospitalized with COVID-19 just on Sunday.

“We can control the beast, yes, but the beast is still alive,” he said. “We did not kill the beast. And the beast can rise up again.”

Brazil’s Bolsonaro defends participating in anti-quarantine rally

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro defended his participation in a weekend rally, where protesters called for an end to quarantine measures and urged military intervention to shut down Congress and the Supreme Court.

Bolsonaro told reporters Monday he personally did not call for shutting down any branch of the government, adding that Brazil is a democracy and referring to the Supreme Court and Congress as “open and transparent.”

He also lashed out at the media, saying he will not “accept provocations by the press.”

National and local governments in Brazil have issued mixed messages on how to behave during the pandemic. While Bolsonaro has been pushing against strict restrictions, state and local governments in some of the country’s hardest-hit areas have closed schools and nonessential businesses, with firefighters and police in the streets urging people to stay indoors.

Brazil has the most confirmed coronavirus cases in Latin America. As of Sunday, Brazil reported 38,654 cases and 2,462 deaths, according to health officials.

Italy’s coronavirus case count decreases for the first time

The number of active COVID-19 cases in Italy has decreased for the first time since the beginning of the crisis, according to figures released by Italy’s Civil Protection Agency.

On Monday there were 108,237 active cases in Italy, down from 108,257 on Sunday.

Dr. Fauci says reopening too quickly will backfire

The top infectious-disease expert in the United States has a message for protesters who are ignoring their governors’ stay-at-home orders and calling for him to be fired over his guidelines.

Dr. Anthony Fauci says the message is “this is something that is hurting from the standpoint of economics, from the standpoint of things that have nothing to do with the virus.”

He added on ABC’s “Good Morning America” that “unless we get the virus under control, the real recovery economically is not gonna happen. So what you do if you jump the gun and go into a situation where you have a big spike, you’re gonna set yourself back.”

Fauci says as painful as it is to follow guidelines of gradually phasing into a reopening “it’s gonna backfire. That’s the problem.”

Video above: An exclusive interview with Dr. Fauci

Some states may announce plans to lift restrictions this week

As many governors across the U.S. say coronavirus testing is far from full capacity, a few states may lift restrictions this week.

Announcements of lifting restrictions come as the United States’ coronavirus death toll topped 40,000 on Sunday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment takes a break outside the Coler Hospital campus at Roosevelt Island amid the coronavirus outbreak in New York City.

Ron Adar / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment takes a break outside the Coler Hospital campus at Roosevelt Island amid the coronavirus outbreak in New York City.

Several regional groups of states have discussed strategies to reopen with each other.

On Monday, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster is expected to announce orders that will lift restrictions on beach, river and lakefront access as well as allow shoppers to return to retail site to purchase jewelry, clothing, and furniture, according to a report from The Post and Courier.

Despite the expected reopening of some sectors of South Carolina, a coalition of coastal towns in the Charleston area said in a joint statement Sunday that they will continue to limit access to non residents and monitor travel within their jurisdictions.

Other states are working on plans to reopen following the release of guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

The guidance suggests that states expand their testing capacity but some say they need more supplies and staff to do so.

States want testing capacities expanded

Over the weekend, President Trump said governors across the country had the capacity to complete more testing but weren’t utilizing their resources properly.

“They don’t want to use all of the capacity that we’ve created. We have tremendous capacity,” Trump said during a briefing at the White House. “They know that. The governors know that. The Democrat governors know that. They’re the ones that are complaining.”

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam called the President’s comments “delusional.”

Northam said he wants to see at least two weeks of tending numbers of coronavirus cases decreasing before businesses in his state reopen.

“We want to make sure we’re doing it responsibly and we’re doing it safely,” the democratic governor of Virginia told CNN’s Jake Tapper on The State of the Union.

“We’ve been fighting for testing, it’s not a straightforward test. We don’t even have enough swabs, believe it or not,” Gov. Northam said.

President Trump said during a briefing Sunday that he’ll invoke the Defense Production Act to increase the manufacturing of swabs, according to the Associated Press. The swabs will be used to test for coronavirus.

“Our testing is expanding very rapidly by millions and millions of people,” Trump said during the briefing, according to CNN.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan also told CNN’s Jake Tapper that Trump’s claim that governors have plenty of tests and simply aren’t doing their job “absolutely false.”

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker gave similar remarks Sunday. He said he wants things to be reopen so residents can enjoy recreation this summer but said they need to listen to scientists and doctors investigating the virus before they can comfortably and safely reopen businesses to the public.

In order to safely do so, the state needs more lab technicians, more reagent and more RNA extractors to analyze specimens taken, Pritzker said.

Harvard researchers warned that if the country wants the economy to open back up — and stay that way — testing must go up to at least 500,000 people per day.

Testing nationwide is currently at 150,000 per day, they said, adding that “If we can’t be doing at least 500,000 tests a day by May 1, it is hard to see any way we can remain open.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.