NYC mayor asks residents to use face coverings to help slow coronavirus spread

New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio asked New Yorkers to wear a face covering when they go outside and will be near other people.He cited research showing asymptomatic people could be spreading the virus without realizing it.“When you put on that face covering, you’re protecting everyone else,” he said.The mayor said it could be a scarf or a bandanna or anything homemade, but it should not be a surgical mask needed by frontline medical workers.U.S. officials have been telling people to stay at home as much as possible, and keep at least 6 feet away from others when they do go out. Other advice includes frequent hand washing and not touching your face.But federal officials have stopped short of telling people to cover their faces out in public.A recent study by researchers in Singapore became the latest to estimate that somewhere around 10% of new infections may be sparked by people who carry the virus but have not yet suffered its flu-like symptoms.In response to that study and others, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed how it defined the risk of infection for Americans. The agency’s new guidance targeted people who have no symptoms but were exposed to others with known or suspected infections. It essentially says that anyone may be a carrier, whether that person has symptoms or not.Video: Woman sews hundreds of face masks for nurses

New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio asked New Yorkers to wear a face covering when they go outside and will be near other people.

He cited research showing asymptomatic people could be spreading the virus without realizing it.

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“When you put on that face covering, you’re protecting everyone else,” he said.

The mayor said it could be a scarf or a bandanna or anything homemade, but it should not be a surgical mask needed by frontline medical workers.

U.S. officials have been telling people to stay at home as much as possible, and keep at least 6 feet away from others when they do go out. Other advice includes frequent hand washing and not touching your face.

But federal officials have stopped short of telling people to cover their faces out in public.

A recent study by researchers in Singapore became the latest to estimate that somewhere around 10% of new infections may be sparked by people who carry the virus but have not yet suffered its flu-like symptoms.

In response to that study and others, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed how it defined the risk of infection for Americans. The agency’s new guidance targeted people who have no symptoms but were exposed to others with known or suspected infections. It essentially says that anyone may be a carrier, whether that person has symptoms or not.

Video: Woman sews hundreds of face masks for nurses