Rallies at post offices across Maine, U.S., calling for solutions to Postal Service delays

Legislators in the House of Representatives held a rare Saturday vote in hopes of infusing $25 billion into the U.S. Postal Service and halt any ongoing changes.Postmaster General Louis DeJoy had committed to hold off any further changes until after the November election. Recent operational reform under DeJoy has led to mail delays in recent weeks, prompting concern about the agency’s ability to handle the record number of mail-in ballots expected. “Extremely, highly confident,” DeJoy said in testimony to a Senate committee Friday when asked whether ballots sent within seven days before the election would be counted. “We will scour every plant each night leading up to Election Day.”Maine was among the states that received a letter from DeJoy notifying voters that anyone hoping to mail an absentee ballot should request them at least 15 days before the election and submit them at least a week before the election. Maine’s law allows voters to request a ballot up through the Thursday before Election Day.Concerned Mainers gathered in at the U.S. Post Office on Congress Street in Portland Saturday, one of many coordinated “Save the Post Office” rallies at post offices across the country. Organizers in Portland directed their message to President Trump and Senate Republicans, sharing stories of those impacted by recent delays.Among them was Jennifer Jones, an organizer with March Forth, a group formed shortly after the Women’s March in 2017, who says her small farm relies on prompt delivery.Slowing down the post office has had really disastrous results for many people – people aren’t getting medication, they’re not getting their paychecks, mail is getting lost.”In the case of small farmers like me,” Jones said, “we’re receiving dead and dying chicks in the mail.” Jones says it’s a rare problem that only began this summer.Demonstrators expressed support for postal workers, whose unions have voiced concern about the policy changes.In his testimony, DeJoy committed to fulfilling the mail-in process, which he says he both supports and utilizes. The U.S. Postal Service’s Board of Governors announced Saturday a new commission to address any issues handling the mail-in ballots.In a joint statement, the board said, “The United States Postal Service will play an indispensable role in ensuring that those Americans who wish to vote by mail will be able to do so and have their votes counted.”

Legislators in the House of Representatives held a rare Saturday vote in hopes of infusing $25 billion into the U.S. Postal Service and halt any ongoing changes.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy had committed to hold off any further changes until after the November election. Recent operational reform under DeJoy has led to mail delays in recent weeks, prompting concern about the agency’s ability to handle the record number of mail-in ballots expected.

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“Extremely, highly confident,” DeJoy said in testimony to a Senate committee Friday when asked whether ballots sent within seven days before the election would be counted. “We will scour every plant each night leading up to Election Day.”

Maine was among the states that received a letter from DeJoy notifying voters that anyone hoping to mail an absentee ballot should request them at least 15 days before the election and submit them at least a week before the election. Maine’s law allows voters to request a ballot up through the Thursday before Election Day.

Concerned Mainers gathered in at the U.S. Post Office on Congress Street in Portland Saturday, one of many coordinated “Save the Post Office” rallies at post offices across the country.

Organizers in Portland directed their message to President Trump and Senate Republicans, sharing stories of those impacted by recent delays.

Among them was Jennifer Jones, an organizer with March Forth, a group formed shortly after the Women’s March in 2017, who says her small farm relies on prompt delivery.

Slowing down the post office has had really disastrous results for many people – people aren’t getting medication, they’re not getting their paychecks, mail is getting lost.

“In the case of small farmers like me,” Jones said, “we’re receiving dead and dying chicks in the mail.” Jones says it’s a rare problem that only began this summer.

Demonstrators expressed support for postal workers, whose unions have voiced concern about the policy changes.

In his testimony, DeJoy committed to fulfilling the mail-in process, which he says he both supports and utilizes. The U.S. Postal Service’s Board of Governors announced Saturday a new commission to address any issues handling the mail-in ballots.

In a joint statement, the board said, “The United States Postal Service will play an indispensable role in ensuring that those Americans who wish to vote by mail will be able to do so and have their votes counted.”