The Orionid meteor shower is set to peak this week. Here’s what to expect

Stargazers could see quite a show this week — as long as they stay up into the early morning hours and have clear skies.The Orionid meteor shower will be at its peak Tuesday night into Wednesday, offering as many as 15 meteors per hour under a dark, moonless sky. It’s one of two meteor showers fed by Halley’s Comet.The best way to watch a meteor shower? Sit in a chair that reclines or on a blanket in a dark area. Try to position yourself so you can see as much of the sky as possible, since meteors can be seen anywhere in the sky.NASA suggests the best time to watch will be from just after midnight local time until just before dawn. That’s when Orion will be at its highest point in the sky. The strength of the Orionid shower has been varying from year to year, but NASA says there is evidence that a “larger than usual peak” could occur between 2020 and 2022.NASA also suggests allowing up to 45 minutes to allow your eyes to adjust to the darkness for night vision, including not looking at your phone to see what time it is.

Stargazers could see quite a show this week — as long as they stay up into the early morning hours and have clear skies.

The Orionid meteor shower will be at its peak Tuesday night into Wednesday, offering as many as 15 meteors per hour under a dark, moonless sky. It’s one of two meteor showers fed by Halley’s Comet.

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Orionid meteor shower

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The best way to watch a meteor shower? Sit in a chair that reclines or on a blanket in a dark area. Try to position yourself so you can see as much of the sky as possible, since meteors can be seen anywhere in the sky.

NASA suggests the best time to watch will be from just after midnight local time until just before dawn. That’s when Orion will be at its highest point in the sky. The strength of the Orionid shower has been varying from year to year, but NASA says there is evidence that a “larger than usual peak” could occur between 2020 and 2022.

NASA also suggests allowing up to 45 minutes to allow your eyes to adjust to the darkness for night vision, including not looking at your phone to see what time it is.