Tri for a Cure participant makes the most of this year’s virtual event

Many participants of the 2020 Tri for a Cure are finding special opportunities to raise money and awareness, despite this year’s event being a virtual one.For Sheila Pennock, the Tri for a Cure is an electrifying and exciting event and is more than just a race. She remembers when a co-worker asked her to participate years ago and agreed to do it without knowing what she was getting into.”And then about two days later, I said well, ‘What is a triathlon?’ And that was 11 years ago. So that’s how I started. It was serendipity,” Pennock saidThis year could have been isolating, as participants are now competing on their own courses and on their own time through the month of August.But Pennock is making most of the situation. She and her team, “Prosecco Power,” will take on the Tri for a Cure in her hometown of Clinton, Connecticut. She plans to pass by her parents’ resting place, which is a large part of why she says she is involved in the event.”Both of them went through cancer, so what I’m going to do as part of my route, I’m going to zip through the cemetery and just kinda wave at dad and mom.” Pennock hopes everything returns to normal for next year’s event and has some advice for people thinking about signing up. “Just do it. The time doesn’t matter. It’s the feeling at the end that you just did something that maybe you never did before.”The Tri for a Cure continues to raise money for the Maine Cancer Foundation. Click here to donate.

Many participants of the 2020 Tri for a Cure are finding special opportunities to raise money and awareness, despite this year’s event being a virtual one.

For Sheila Pennock, the Tri for a Cure is an electrifying and exciting event and is more than just a race. She remembers when a co-worker asked her to participate years ago and agreed to do it without knowing what she was getting into.

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“And then about two days later, I said well, ‘What is a triathlon?’ And that was 11 years ago. So that’s how I started. It was serendipity,” Pennock said

This year could have been isolating, as participants are now competing on their own courses and on their own time through the month of August.

But Pennock is making most of the situation. She and her team, “Prosecco Power,” will take on the Tri for a Cure in her hometown of Clinton, Connecticut. She plans to pass by her parents’ resting place, which is a large part of why she says she is involved in the event.

“Both of them went through cancer, so what I’m going to do as part of my route, I’m going to zip through the cemetery and just kinda wave at dad and mom.”

Pennock hopes everything returns to normal for next year’s event and has some advice for people thinking about signing up.

“Just do it. The time doesn’t matter. It’s the feeling at the end that you just did something that maybe you never did before.”

The Tri for a Cure continues to raise money for the Maine Cancer Foundation.

Click here to donate.