US protests erupt after cop charged in George Floyd death; military police put on alert

The latest:The Minneapolis officer who was seen on video kneeling on the neck of George Floyd has been arrested and charged with murder. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey declared a curfew from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Protesters defied that order, though, swarming streets.Demonstrators marched, stopped traffic and in some cases lashed out violently at police as protests erupted Friday in dozens of U.S. cities.The Pentagon took the rare step of ordering the Army to put several active-duty U.S. military police units on the ready to deploy to Minneapolis.The Minnesota National Guard is activating more than 1,000 additional personnel today, the group announced in a tweet Saturday morning. This is addition to the 700 citizen soldiers and airmen who were on duty last night, according to the tweet. Protesters nationwide have demanded justice for George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died this week after a white police officer used his knee to pin him down in an incident captured on video. Protesters smashed windows at CNN’s headquarters in Atlanta, torched a police car and struck officers with bottles. Large demonstrations in New York, Houston, Washington, D.C., and other cities ranged from people peacefully blocking roads to fatal shootings.The white Minneapolis police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck was arrested and charged Friday, and authorities imposed an overnight curfew to try to stem three nights of often-violent protests that left dozens of stores burned and looted.Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin, 44, has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the case. He was also accused of ignoring another officer at the scene who expressed concerns about the black man as he lay handcuffed on the ground, pleading that he could not breathe. Floyd had been arrested on suspicion of using a counterfeit bill at a small grocery store.Chauvin’s wife, Kellie Chauvin, has filed for a dissolution of their marriage, according to reports. Military police put on alertAs unrest spread across dozens of American cities on Friday, the Pentagon took the rare step of ordering the Army to put several active-duty U.S. military police units on the ready to deploy to Minneapolis.Soldiers from Fort Bragg in North Carolina and Fort Drum in New York have been ordered to be ready to deploy within four hours if called, according to three people with direct knowledge of the orders. Soldiers in Fort Carson, in Colorado, and Fort Riley in Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours. The people did not want their names used because they were not authorized to discuss the preparations.The get-ready orders were sent verbally on Friday, after President Donald Trump asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options to help quell the unrest in Minneapolis after protests descended into looting and arson in some parts of the city.Trump made the request on a phone call from the Oval Office on Thursday night that included Esper, National Security Advisor Robert O’ Brien and several others. The president asked Esper for rapid deployment options if the Minneapolis protests continued to spiral out of control, according to one of the people, senior Pentagon official who was on the call.”When the White House asks for options, someone opens the drawer and pulls them out so to speak.” the official said.The person said the military units would be deployed under the Insurrection Act of 1807, which was last used in 1992 during the riots in Los Angeles that followed the Rodney King trial.“If this is where the president is headed response-wise, it would represent a significant escalation and a determination that the various state and local authorities are not up to the task of responding to the growing unrest,” Brad Moss, a Washington D.C.-based attorney, who specializes in national security.Members of the police units were on a 30-minute recall alert early Saturday, meaning they would have to return to their bases inside that time limit in preparation for deployment to Minneapolis inside of four hours. Units at Fort Drum are slated to head to Minneapolis first, according to the three people, including two Defense Department officials. Roughly 800 U.S. soldiers would deploy to the city if called.Protesters brazenly resist curfewIn Minneapolis, thousands of protesters marched through downtown as an 8 p.m. curfew ticked past. “Prosecute the police!” some chanted, and “Say his name: George Floyd!” The curfew didn’t stop protesters and others from gathering in several areas of the city, including the battered Lake Street neighborhood where a police precinct was burned the night before. There were scattered small fires and some stores in a strip mall were being broken into near the city’s 5th Precinct. Elsewhere in the city, officers fired tear gas and rubber bullets to drive back crowds of protesters.Chauvin’s arrest came moments after Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said he expected swift justice in the death of Floyd, whose death sparked protests nationwide.Minnesota Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington announced Chauvin’s arrest following the governor’s news conference Friday.The arrest comes after three days of protests, which escalated in violence as demonstrators torched a police precinct that had been abandoned by officers.Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Friday acknowledged the “abject failure” of the response to this week’s violent protests. Walz said the state would take over the response and that it’s time to show respect and dignity to those who are suffering.Peaceful, violent protests occur throughout USProtests also took place in at least 25 other cities, including Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and New Orleans. Georgia’s governor declared a state of emergency early Saturday to activate the state National Guard as violence flared in Atlanta.The Guard was also on standby in the District of Columbia, where a crowd grew outside the White House and chanted curses at President Donald Trump. Some protesters tried to push through barriers set up by the U.S. Secret Service along Pennsylvania Avenue, and threw bottles and other objects at officers wearing riot gear, who responded with pepper spray.In Oakland, California, police said two Federal Protective Service officers were shot during protests Friday night. One of the officers died from his injury.At least 7,500 protesters took to the streets of the city to demonstrate over the death of George Floyd, the Oakland Police Department told CNN. While arrests were made, police were unable to provide specifics and are still investigating. The Federal Protective Service, which falls under the Department of Homeland Security, provides security and law enforcement services at U.S. government facilities.In Portland, Oregon, police reported three shootings involving two victims, one of which involved a man having a gunshot wound in the chest. A fire burned in a downtown street and video appeared to show dozens of people taking bags from a Louis Vuitton store inside Pioneer Place mall.Police, who declared the protest a riot, said they deployed gas after people threw projectiles at them.Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler tweeted a plea to protesters to remain peaceful and said that, while he had left Portland to attend to his dying mother, he was heading back.“Portland, this is not us,” he wrote. “When you destroy our city, you are destroying our community. When you act in violence against each other, you are hurting all of us. How does this honor the legacy of George Floyd?”An initially peaceful demonstration in New York City spiraled into chaos as night fell, as protesters skirmished with officers, destroyed police vehicles and set fires. In Brooklyn, activists who had marched from Manhattan chanted insults at officers lined up outside the Barclays Center and pelted them with water bottles. Police sprayed an eye-irritating chemical into the largely diverse crowd multiple times, then cleared the plaza.Video posted to social media showed officers using batons and shoving protesters down as they took people into custody and cleared streets.Demonstrators rocked a police van, set it ablaze, then scrawled graffiti across its charred hulk and set it on fire a second time as officers retreated from the area. Blocks away, protesters used a club to batter another police vehicle.Numerous people were arrested and police brought in buses to take away prisoners.One person was killed in downtown Detroit after someone in an SUV fired shots into a crowd of protesters, a Detroit police spokeswoman said Saturday.The shooting occurred about 11:30 p.m. Friday near Detroit’s Greektown entertainment district as officers were confronted with dozens of protesters, said Sgt. Nicole Kirkwood, a police department spokeswoman. She said an officer wasn’t involved in the shooting.Kirkwood said the victim was a 19-year-old man, who was pronounced dead at the hospital. The suspect pulled up in a Dodge Durango and fired shots into the crowd, she said. In Houston, where George Floyd grew up, several thousand people rallied in front of City Hall. Police had apparently taken into custody a woman who had a rifle and had tried to use it to incite the crowd.Jimmy Ohaz, 19, came from the nearby city of Richmond, Texas.“My question is how many more, how many more? I just want to live in a future where we all live in harmony and we’re not oppressed.” Houston police tweeted early Saturday that nearly 200 arrests were made and four officers were injured during the protests. Attorneys seek outside probe of Floyd’s deathAttorneys for the families of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor are calling for an independent investigation of the actions leading to Floyd’s death.They also want national reforms in response to the three deaths.Documents said that an autopsy revealed nothing to support strangulation as the cause of death. The exam concluded that the combined effects of being restrained, potential intoxicants in Floyd’s system and his underlying health issues, including heart disease, likely contributed to his death. Attorney Ben Crump said during a news conference Friday that he’s asked to take custody of Floyd’s body for an independent autopsy. He and attorney Lee Merritt said they want murder charges brought against the four Minneapolis police officers involved in Floyd’s arrest. And they want the Minnesota attorney general to take over the investigation. Police were trying to put Floyd in a squad car when he stiffened up and fell to the ground, saying he was claustrophobic, a criminal complaint said. Chauvin and officer Tou Thoa arrived to help and tried several times to get the struggling Floyd into the car, the complaint said.At one point, Chauvin pulled Floyd out of the car’s passenger side, and Floyd, who was handcuffed, went to the ground face down. Officer J.K. Kueng held Floyd’s back, and officer Thomas Lane held his legs, while Chauvin put his knee on Floyd’s head and neck area, the complaint said.When Lane asked if Floyd should be rolled onto his side Chauvin said, “No, staying put is where we got him.” Lane said he was “worried about excited delirium or whatever,” and Chauvin replied, “That’s why we have him on his stomach,” according to the complaint.Crump says the families from Georgia, Kentucky and now Minnesota have all had to dispel narratives from law enforcement that their loved ones “brought this upon themselves.” They cited an initial report in Floyd’s case that said he threatened police and died of a medical condition.Videos show an officer kneeling on the back of Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man pleads for air.The attorneys said they’ll seek national legislation seeking better training and to lower the burden to charge officers for excessive force.Twitter adds warning label to Trump tweet for ‘glorifying violence’Late Thursday, President Donald Trump blasted the “total lack of leadership” in Minneapolis. “Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” he said on Twitter.Twitter said the president violated its rule against glorifying violence and later affixed a warning label to the tweet — the first time such action has been taken against the president’s account.The social media platform is using what it calls a “public interest notice” to flag the post.Trump responded Friday morning with a tweet saying Twitter has “targeted Republicans, Conservatives & the President of the United States.”Twitter has said in the past that it makes exceptions to its rules when heads of state are involved, due to the inherently newsworthy nature of their posts.The company’s flagging of Trump’s post came hours after the president signed an executive order Thursday that purported to address “censorship” by Twitter and other social media companies. He was perturbed by Twitter’s decision to affix fact-check type labels to two of his misleading posts about mail-in voting ballots.Investigation aheadThe U.S. Attorney’s Office and the FBI in Minneapolis said Thursday they were conducting “a robust criminal investigation” into the death. President Donald Trump has said he had asked an investigation to be expedited.The FBI is also investigating whether Floyd’s civil rights were violated. CNN contributed to this report.

The latest:

  • The Minneapolis officer who was seen on video kneeling on the neck of George Floyd has been arrested and charged with murder.
  • Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey declared a curfew from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Protesters defied that order, though, swarming streets.
  • Demonstrators marched, stopped traffic and in some cases lashed out violently at police as protests erupted Friday in dozens of U.S. cities.
  • The Pentagon took the rare step of ordering the Army to put several active-duty U.S. military police units on the ready to deploy to Minneapolis.
  • The Minnesota National Guard is activating more than 1,000 additional personnel today, the group announced in a tweet Saturday morning. This is addition to the 700 citizen soldiers and airmen who were on duty last night, according to the tweet.

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Protesters nationwide have demanded justice for George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died this week after a white police officer used his knee to pin him down in an incident captured on video.

Protesters smashed windows at CNN’s headquarters in Atlanta, torched a police car and struck officers with bottles. Large demonstrations in New York, Houston, Washington, D.C., and other cities ranged from people peacefully blocking roads to fatal shootings.

The white Minneapolis police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck was arrested and charged Friday, and authorities imposed an overnight curfew to try to stem three nights of often-violent protests that left dozens of stores burned and looted.

Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin, 44, has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the case. He was also accused of ignoring another officer at the scene who expressed concerns about the black man as he lay handcuffed on the ground, pleading that he could not breathe. Floyd had been arrested on suspicion of using a counterfeit bill at a small grocery store.

Chauvin’s wife, Kellie Chauvin, has filed for a dissolution of their marriage, according to reports.

Derek Chauvin, 44, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Derek Chauvin, 44, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Military police put on alert

As unrest spread across dozens of American cities on Friday, the Pentagon took the rare step of ordering the Army to put several active-duty U.S. military police units on the ready to deploy to Minneapolis.

Soldiers from Fort Bragg in North Carolina and Fort Drum in New York have been ordered to be ready to deploy within four hours if called, according to three people with direct knowledge of the orders. Soldiers in Fort Carson, in Colorado, and Fort Riley in Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours. The people did not want their names used because they were not authorized to discuss the preparations.

The get-ready orders were sent verbally on Friday, after President Donald Trump asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options to help quell the unrest in Minneapolis after protests descended into looting and arson in some parts of the city.

Trump made the request on a phone call from the Oval Office on Thursday night that included Esper, National Security Advisor Robert O’ Brien and several others. The president asked Esper for rapid deployment options if the Minneapolis protests continued to spiral out of control, according to one of the people, senior Pentagon official who was on the call.

”When the White House asks for options, someone opens the drawer and pulls them out so to speak.” the official said.

The person said the military units would be deployed under the Insurrection Act of 1807, which was last used in 1992 during the riots in Los Angeles that followed the Rodney King trial.

“If this is where the president is headed response-wise, it would represent a significant escalation and a determination that the various state and local authorities are not up to the task of responding to the growing unrest,” Brad Moss, a Washington D.C.-based attorney, who specializes in national security.

Members of the police units were on a 30-minute recall alert early Saturday, meaning they would have to return to their bases inside that time limit in preparation for deployment to Minneapolis inside of four hours. Units at Fort Drum are slated to head to Minneapolis first, according to the three people, including two Defense Department officials. Roughly 800 U.S. soldiers would deploy to the city if called.

Protesters brazenly resist curfew

In Minneapolis, thousands of protesters marched through downtown as an 8 p.m. curfew ticked past. “Prosecute the police!” some chanted, and “Say his name: George Floyd!”

The curfew didn’t stop protesters and others from gathering in several areas of the city, including the battered Lake Street neighborhood where a police precinct was burned the night before.

There were scattered small fires and some stores in a strip mall were being broken into near the city’s 5th Precinct. Elsewhere in the city, officers fired tear gas and rubber bullets to drive back crowds of protesters.

Chauvin’s arrest came moments after Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said he expected swift justice in the death of Floyd, whose death sparked protests nationwide.

Minnesota Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington announced Chauvin’s arrest following the governor’s news conference Friday.

The arrest comes after three days of protests, which escalated in violence as demonstrators torched a police precinct that had been abandoned by officers.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Friday acknowledged the “abject failure” of the response to this week’s violent protests. Walz said the state would take over the response and that it’s time to show respect and dignity to those who are suffering.

Peaceful, violent protests occur throughout US

Protests also took place in at least 25 other cities, including Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and New Orleans.

Georgia’s governor declared a state of emergency early Saturday to activate the state National Guard as violence flared in Atlanta.

The Guard was also on standby in the District of Columbia, where a crowd grew outside the White House and chanted curses at President Donald Trump. Some protesters tried to push through barriers set up by the U.S. Secret Service along Pennsylvania Avenue, and threw bottles and other objects at officers wearing riot gear, who responded with pepper spray.

In Oakland, California, police said two Federal Protective Service officers were shot during protests Friday night.

One of the officers died from his injury.

At least 7,500 protesters took to the streets of the city to demonstrate over the death of George Floyd, the Oakland Police Department told CNN.

While arrests were made, police were unable to provide specifics and are still investigating.

The Federal Protective Service, which falls under the Department of Homeland Security, provides security and law enforcement services at U.S. government facilities.

In Portland, Oregon, police reported three shootings involving two victims, one of which involved a man having a gunshot wound in the chest. A fire burned in a downtown street and video appeared to show dozens of people taking bags from a Louis Vuitton store inside Pioneer Place mall.

Police, who declared the protest a riot, said they deployed gas after people threw projectiles at them.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler tweeted a plea to protesters to remain peaceful and said that, while he had left Portland to attend to his dying mother, he was heading back.

“Portland, this is not us,” he wrote. “When you destroy our city, you are destroying our community. When you act in violence against each other, you are hurting all of us. How does this honor the legacy of George Floyd?”

An initially peaceful demonstration in New York City spiraled into chaos as night fell, as protesters skirmished with officers, destroyed police vehicles and set fires.

In Brooklyn, activists who had marched from Manhattan chanted insults at officers lined up outside the Barclays Center and pelted them with water bottles. Police sprayed an eye-irritating chemical into the largely diverse crowd multiple times, then cleared the plaza.

Video posted to social media showed officers using batons and shoving protesters down as they took people into custody and cleared streets.

Demonstrators rocked a police van, set it ablaze, then scrawled graffiti across its charred hulk and set it on fire a second time as officers retreated from the area. Blocks away, protesters used a club to batter another police vehicle.

Numerous people were arrested and police brought in buses to take away prisoners.

One person was killed in downtown Detroit after someone in an SUV fired shots into a crowd of protesters, a Detroit police spokeswoman said Saturday.

The shooting occurred about 11:30 p.m. Friday near Detroit’s Greektown entertainment district as officers were confronted with dozens of protesters, said Sgt. Nicole Kirkwood, a police department spokeswoman. She said an officer wasn’t involved in the shooting.

Kirkwood said the victim was a 19-year-old man, who was pronounced dead at the hospital. The suspect pulled up in a Dodge Durango and fired shots into the crowd, she said.

In Houston, where George Floyd grew up, several thousand people rallied in front of City Hall. Police had apparently taken into custody a woman who had a rifle and had tried to use it to incite the crowd.

Jimmy Ohaz, 19, came from the nearby city of Richmond, Texas.

“My question is how many more, how many more? I just want to live in a future where we all live in harmony and we’re not oppressed.”

Houston police tweeted early Saturday that nearly 200 arrests were made and four officers were injured during the protests.

Attorneys seek outside probe of Floyd’s death

Attorneys for the families of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor are calling for an independent investigation of the actions leading to Floyd’s death.

They also want national reforms in response to the three deaths.

Documents said that an autopsy revealed nothing to support strangulation as the cause of death. The exam concluded that the combined effects of being restrained, potential intoxicants in Floyd’s system and his underlying health issues, including heart disease, likely contributed to his death.

Attorney Ben Crump said during a news conference Friday that he’s asked to take custody of Floyd’s body for an independent autopsy. He and attorney Lee Merritt said they want murder charges brought against the four Minneapolis police officers involved in Floyd’s arrest. And they want the Minnesota attorney general to take over the investigation.

Police were trying to put Floyd in a squad car when he stiffened up and fell to the ground, saying he was claustrophobic, a criminal complaint said. Chauvin and officer Tou Thoa arrived to help and tried several times to get the struggling Floyd into the car, the complaint said.

At one point, Chauvin pulled Floyd out of the car’s passenger side, and Floyd, who was handcuffed, went to the ground face down. Officer J.K. Kueng held Floyd’s back, and officer Thomas Lane held his legs, while Chauvin put his knee on Floyd’s head and neck area, the complaint said.

When Lane asked if Floyd should be rolled onto his side Chauvin said, “No, staying put is where we got him.” Lane said he was “worried about excited delirium or whatever,” and Chauvin replied, “That’s why we have him on his stomach,” according to the complaint.

Crump says the families from Georgia, Kentucky and now Minnesota have all had to dispel narratives from law enforcement that their loved ones “brought this upon themselves.” They cited an initial report in Floyd’s case that said he threatened police and died of a medical condition.

Videos show an officer kneeling on the back of Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man pleads for air.

The attorneys said they’ll seek national legislation seeking better training and to lower the burden to charge officers for excessive force.

Twitter adds warning label to Trump tweet for ‘glorifying violence’

Late Thursday, President Donald Trump blasted the “total lack of leadership” in Minneapolis. “Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” he said on Twitter.

Twitter said the president violated its rule against glorifying violence and later affixed a warning label to the tweet — the first time such action has been taken against the president’s account.

The social media platform is using what it calls a “public interest notice” to flag the post.

Trump responded Friday morning with a tweet saying Twitter has “targeted Republicans, Conservatives & the President of the United States.”

Twitter has said in the past that it makes exceptions to its rules when heads of state are involved, due to the inherently newsworthy nature of their posts.

The company’s flagging of Trump’s post came hours after the president signed an executive order Thursday that purported to address “censorship” by Twitter and other social media companies. He was perturbed by Twitter’s decision to affix fact-check type labels to two of his misleading posts about mail-in voting ballots.

Investigation ahead

The U.S. Attorney’s Office and the FBI in Minneapolis said Thursday they were conducting “a robust criminal investigation” into the death. President Donald Trump has said he had asked an investigation to be expedited.

The FBI is also investigating whether Floyd’s civil rights were violated.

CNN contributed to this report.