Watch Live: Trump and Biden face off in presidential debate

President Donald Trump and Democrat Joe Biden are meeting in their first debate in a presidential election year marked by extraordinary turmoil.With the election 35 days away and early votes already being cast in some states, Biden has kept a lead over the Republican president in most national polls. While debates have not significantly shaken up the election in recent years, Tuesday’s highly anticipated matchup will offer the clearest contrast yet between the two men.The debate, beginning at 9 p.m. Eastern Time in Cleveland, is the first of three between Trump and Biden.These are the six topics that are expected to be brought up during the debate: Trump and Biden RecordsThe Supreme CourtCOVID-19The EconomyRace and Violence in our CitiesThe Integrity of the ElectionHere’s a look at what the candidates said about those topics:The Supreme CourtThe first face-off for Trump and Biden came over a clash concerning a president’s prerogative to push through an election-year Supreme Court nominee.Trump says that Republicans “won the election and therefore we have the right to choose” Amy Coney Barrett as a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.Trump added that he felt Democrats “wouldn’t even think about not doing it” if given the chance to nominate a justice with just weeks until the election.Biden and other Democrats have decried Trump’s nomination of a new justice given Republicans’ refusal to consider President Barack Obama’s selection following the 2016 death of Antonin Scalia. Biden didn’t mention that during the debate, however.Biden says that Barrett seems like “a very fine person” but that her nomination after “tens of thousands of people have already voted” was troubling.The debate became contentious as the candidates began to speak over each other with moderator Chris Wallace attempting to regain control of the conversation.Biden said Barrett believed the ACA was unconstitutional and would strike it down.COVID-19Turning to the coronavirus pandemic, Wallace asked both candidates why the public should put their trust in them.“200,000 dead,” Biden started, alluding to the number of Americans that have died under President Trump’s watch. “We have 4% of the world’s population and 20% of the deaths. “The president has no plan,” he continued. Biden criticized Trump for downplaying the virus at the start of the outbreak, despite audio recordings showing the president understood its danger.“He waited, and waited and waited,” Biden charged.“If we listened to you,” Trump said, “millions would be dead.” Trump added it was “China’s fault” for the virus spread. The president criticized Biden for calling him xenophobic, which Biden interrupted saying it was unrelated to the president’s COVID-19 response.President Trump touted his virus response, lauding his administration supplying ventilators and tests.“You could never have done the job we did,” Trump said to Biden. He followed up criticizing the Obama administration, which Biden served as the Vice President, about the number of deaths from swine flu, which Biden said was far fewer deaths than COVID-19.Biden spat back with the personal effect the virus has had on Americans under Trump’s watch.“How many of you woke up today with an empty chair at the kitchen table?” Biden said. “His own CDC director says we could lose another 200,000.”On the topic of reopening, Biden said businesses must have the money to reopen. Trump accused Biden of wanting to “shutdown the country.”Trump said more people will be hurt if they reopen.Wallace asked Trump if he believes in masks, which Trump produced a mask from his breast pocket as proof.“Masks make a big difference,” Biden said, and alluded to Trump’s own head of the CDC saying they are effective. Trump responded saying the CDC has been wrong as well.Wallace asked about the candidates different rally sizes.“People want to hear what I have to say,” Trump said.Wallace asked if Trump is worried about virus spread, which Trump moved away from saying Biden had smaller crowds.“He’s not worried about you,” Biden criticized. “He’s been totally irresponsible with the way he’s handled social distancing.”Trump accused Biden of only holding small crowd sizes because he couldn’t get larger crowds.The EconomyOn the economy, Trump repeats his campaign line that he shepherded in the best economy in the nation’s history and claimed that Biden would ruin it by shutting it back down. Biden maintained that the economic recovery is only helping the wealthy. He added that the only way to get the economy moving is to fix the COVID-problem.“You can’t fix the economy until you fix the COVID crisis,” Biden said.The conversation moved into the recent New York Times investigation that showed Trump paid $750 in federal income tax in 2016 and 2017. Trump refuted the report and said he paid millions of dollars in taxes in those years. Biden interrupted and told the president to release his tax returns, which the president said he would do after an audit is over.Biden said Trump “does take advantage of the tax code” and “pays less tax than a schoolteacher.”Trump shrugged off the attack, saying that all business leaders do the same “unless they are stupid.”Race and Violence in Our CitiesAfter fighting to gain control, charging Trump with the lion’s share of interrupting Wallace asked candidates about how they plan to deal with protests and riots in major cities. “It’s about equity and equality. It’s about decency and the constitution,” Biden said. The former vice president alluded to the president’s “very fine people” comment during the Charlottesville “Unite the Right” protest, accusing him of stoking tensions.Biden argued against Trump’s claim that he has done more than any president, save for President Abraham Lincoln, for the Black community, by criticizing that the coronavirus disproportionately kills Black Americans.Trump spat back on Biden’s support of the 1990 crime bill, saying Biden referred to Black Americans as “super predators.”Trump criticized Biden’s lack of support from police officers and sheriffs. He touted his response to protests and riots, particularly sending in federal troops to Portland, Oregon.Wallace ask both candidates about the Breonna Taylor case.Biden said he believes there is systemic injustice for Black Americans in the United States, but also said most police officers are good people.Biden said he would call together a gathering of civil rights groups and police representatives to find a solution to systemic injustice.He also said “peaceful protests” are appropriate but riots are not, a statement which Trump was skeptical of.Wallace asked about Trump’s administration ceasing racial sensitivity training in federal agencies, which Trump said was “racist.” He called racial sensitivity training “radical.””They are teaching people to hate our country,” Trump said.Biden disagreed, and said Trump is the racist.Wallace asked Trump if the protests and riots are a party issue, which Trump said it was. Trump continued to attack Biden saying he couldn’t support the suburbs.”He wouldn’t know a suburb unless he took a wrong turn,” Biden said.Asked about reimagining policing, Biden said he wanted more funding and community policing to assist in relations between officers and the community.Trump asked Biden to name one law enforcement group who supported him, which Biden attempted to move on from before Wallace moved to the next question.Wallace asked if either candidate has called governors suggesting they crack down on protests. Biden said he is not a serving member of government and hadn’t. He continued that governors would have an easier time dealing with them if Trump would stay out of the way.Trump said the National Guard should be sent in.Wallace asked if Trump was willing to ask militant groups to stand down in protests. Trump said he would, saying, particularly to the Proud Boys, “stand down and stand by.”Watch the debate live in the video player above.

President Donald Trump and Democrat Joe Biden are meeting in their first debate in a presidential election year marked by extraordinary turmoil.

With the election 35 days away and early votes already being cast in some states, Biden has kept a lead over the Republican president in most national polls. While debates have not significantly shaken up the election in recent years, Tuesday’s highly anticipated matchup will offer the clearest contrast yet between the two men.

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The debate, beginning at 9 p.m. Eastern Time in Cleveland, is the first of three between Trump and Biden.

These are the six topics that are expected to be brought up during the debate:

  • Trump and Biden Records
  • The Supreme Court
  • COVID-19
  • The Economy
  • Race and Violence in our Cities
  • The Integrity of the Election

Here’s a look at what the candidates said about those topics:

The Supreme Court

The first face-off for Trump and Biden came over a clash concerning a president’s prerogative to push through an election-year Supreme Court nominee.

Trump says that Republicans “won the election and therefore we have the right to choose” Amy Coney Barrett as a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Trump added that he felt Democrats “wouldn’t even think about not doing it” if given the chance to nominate a justice with just weeks until the election.

Biden and other Democrats have decried Trump’s nomination of a new justice given Republicans’ refusal to consider President Barack Obama’s selection following the 2016 death of Antonin Scalia. Biden didn’t mention that during the debate, however.

Biden says that Barrett seems like “a very fine person” but that her nomination after “tens of thousands of people have already voted” was troubling.

The debate became contentious as the candidates began to speak over each other with moderator Chris Wallace attempting to regain control of the conversation.

Biden said Barrett believed the ACA was unconstitutional and would strike it down.

President Donald Trump holds up his face mask during the first presidential debate Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, at Case Western University and Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

APJulio Cortez

President Donald Trump holds up his face mask during the first presidential debate Tuesday.

COVID-19

Turning to the coronavirus pandemic, Wallace asked both candidates why the public should put their trust in them.

“200,000 dead,” Biden started, alluding to the number of Americans that have died under President Trump’s watch. “We have 4% of the world’s population and 20% of the deaths.

“The president has no plan,” he continued.

Biden criticized Trump for downplaying the virus at the start of the outbreak, despite audio recordings showing the president understood its danger.

“He waited, and waited and waited,” Biden charged.

“If we listened to you,” Trump said, “millions would be dead.”

Trump added it was “China’s fault” for the virus spread. The president criticized Biden for calling him xenophobic, which Biden interrupted saying it was unrelated to the president’s COVID-19 response.

President Trump touted his virus response, lauding his administration supplying ventilators and tests.

“You could never have done the job we did,” Trump said to Biden. He followed up criticizing the Obama administration, which Biden served as the Vice President, about the number of deaths from swine flu, which Biden said was far fewer deaths than COVID-19.

Biden spat back with the personal effect the virus has had on Americans under Trump’s watch.

“How many of you woke up today with an empty chair at the kitchen table?” Biden said. “His own CDC director says we could lose another 200,000.”

On the topic of reopening, Biden said businesses must have the money to reopen. Trump accused Biden of wanting to “shutdown the country.”

Trump said more people will be hurt if they reopen.

Wallace asked Trump if he believes in masks, which Trump produced a mask from his breast pocket as proof.

“Masks make a big difference,” Biden said, and alluded to Trump’s own head of the CDC saying they are effective. Trump responded saying the CDC has been wrong as well.

Wallace asked about the candidates different rally sizes.

“People want to hear what I have to say,” Trump said.

Wallace asked if Trump is worried about virus spread, which Trump moved away from saying Biden had smaller crowds.

“He’s not worried about you,” Biden criticized. “He’s been totally irresponsible with the way he’s handled social distancing.”

Trump accused Biden of only holding small crowd sizes because he couldn’t get larger crowds.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden smiles during the first presidential debate Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, at Case Western University and Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

APPatrick Semansky

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden smiles during the first presidential debate Tuesday.

The Economy

On the economy, Trump repeats his campaign line that he shepherded in the best economy in the nation’s history and claimed that Biden would ruin it by shutting it back down. Biden maintained that the economic recovery is only helping the wealthy. He added that the only way to get the economy moving is to fix the COVID-problem.“You can’t fix the economy until you fix the COVID crisis,” Biden said.

The conversation moved into the recent New York Times investigation that showed Trump paid $750 in federal income tax in 2016 and 2017. Trump refuted the report and said he paid millions of dollars in taxes in those years. Biden interrupted and told the president to release his tax returns, which the president said he would do after an audit is over.

Biden said Trump “does take advantage of the tax code” and “pays less tax than a schoolteacher.”

Trump shrugged off the attack, saying that all business leaders do the same “unless they are stupid.”

Race and Violence in Our Cities

After fighting to gain control, charging Trump with the lion’s share of interrupting Wallace asked candidates about how they plan to deal with protests and riots in major cities.

“It’s about equity and equality. It’s about decency and the constitution,” Biden said.

The former vice president alluded to the president’s “very fine people” comment during the Charlottesville “Unite the Right” protest, accusing him of stoking tensions.

Biden argued against Trump’s claim that he has done more than any president, save for President Abraham Lincoln, for the Black community, by criticizing that the coronavirus disproportionately kills Black Americans.

Trump spat back on Biden’s support of the 1990 crime bill, saying Biden referred to Black Americans as “super predators.”

Trump criticized Biden’s lack of support from police officers and sheriffs. He touted his response to protests and riots, particularly sending in federal troops to Portland, Oregon.

Wallace ask both candidates about the Breonna Taylor case.

Biden said he believes there is systemic injustice for Black Americans in the United States, but also said most police officers are good people.

Biden said he would call together a gathering of civil rights groups and police representatives to find a solution to systemic injustice.

He also said “peaceful protests” are appropriate but riots are not, a statement which Trump was skeptical of.

Wallace asked about Trump’s administration ceasing racial sensitivity training in federal agencies, which Trump said was “racist.” He called racial sensitivity training “radical.”

“They are teaching people to hate our country,” Trump said.

Biden disagreed, and said Trump is the racist.

Wallace asked Trump if the protests and riots are a party issue, which Trump said it was.

Trump continued to attack Biden saying he couldn’t support the suburbs.

“He wouldn’t know a suburb unless he took a wrong turn,” Biden said.

Asked about reimagining policing, Biden said he wanted more funding and community policing to assist in relations between officers and the community.

Trump asked Biden to name one law enforcement group who supported him, which Biden attempted to move on from before Wallace moved to the next question.

Wallace asked if either candidate has called governors suggesting they crack down on protests. Biden said he is not a serving member of government and hadn’t. He continued that governors would have an easier time dealing with them if Trump would stay out of the way.

Trump said the National Guard should be sent in.

Wallace asked if Trump was willing to ask militant groups to stand down in protests. Trump said he would, saying, particularly to the Proud Boys, “stand down and stand by.”

Watch the debate live in the video player above.