What you need to know about COVID-19: Contact tracing is not possible in parts of US due to surges, expert says

um, Kobe. 19 Symptoms can take up to 2 to 14 days to develop. During that time, it is possible to spread the virus before you know you’re sick. We do recommend that you self quarantine. Okay. We knew that there were a lot of support activities that we’re gonna be necessary for public health, public health department like ours. And that’s where the contact tracing came in. But it also included additional support for epidemiology program, which actually, along with the contact tracers of the 300 hires, we’ve actually gone from 25 in that epidemiology program pre cove it to, ah 100 to now 4 500 prevention business. We want to prevent people from getting sick in the first place by identifying where they are identifying who’s testing positive and then certainly trying to interrupt transmission. I’m very concerned about public health officials across the country who have had political pressures who’ve had to retire, resign, er, where they’ve been let go. I’m also very concerned about public health workforce across the country who, by the way, are doing everything they can to be following up and responding on behalf of their communities and not getting that really notoriety or that that really respect that you’re getting even in other sectors, like health care, they’re also heroes. We’ll tow us. We are not concerned with politics here. We’re concerned with helping the community. We’re concerned with science and hard facts. You’re you’re almost a counselor. At times when you’re talking to people, you’re just you try to let them know that Hey, you’re gonna be OK. And we’re gonna make it through this. And, you know, if they’re on the phone and they’re able to carry a long conversation with you, which sometimes can last 30 2 45 minutes, you know, they’re usually doing okay. Medical opposition to stuff your symptoms.

Advertisement

What you need to know about COVID-19: Contact tracing is not possible in parts of US due to surges, expert says

Despite hopes for relief this summer, the U.S. is battling the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic — so much so that across the South and Southwest, contact tracing is no longer possible, according to a health expert.”The cases are rising so rapidly, that we cannot even do contact tracing anymore. I don’t see how it’s possible to even do that,” Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of tropical medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, told CNN Monday.The rapid rise in cases is considered a surge, not a second wave, because the infection numbers never lowered to where officials hoped they would, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci said in a Facebook and Twitter livestream Monday.”We are still knee-deep in the first wave of this,” Fauci said.The latest numbersThe U.S. has reported more than 2.9 million cases of the virus and at least 130,900 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.The national case count hits new records almost daily, Hotez said.Though Florida set a record for most new cases in a single day over the weekend, the state announced this week that its schools will open their doors in August.But Florida is among at least 24 that are pausing or rolling back their reopening plans for the summer in light of surging cases.”It’s hard to do economic reopenings successfully if we don’t get cases in check,” Dr. Mark McClellan, the former Food and Drug Administration commissioner who is advising Texas Gov. Greg Abbott about coronavirus, told CNN on Tuesday.Abbott last week ordered most of Texas’ population to wear masks in public to help curb transmission.”We really do need the vast majority of people to do this: to not just avoid crowded bars, but … (also) to wear the mask,” McClellan said.That flare up can be seen in at least 31 states, where the number of new cases increased from last week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.Those states include: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.Only four states have seen improvements in the number of cases since the previous week: Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. The remaining 15 states have been holding steady. One of the main drivers behind the nearly 3 million cases now could be “silent spreaders,” or people who are asymptomatic or presymptomatic, according to a new study.The report, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that asymptomatic or presymptomatic cases could be responsible for half of cases. Economic ImpactThe June jobs report last week showed a net gain 4.8 million jobs, a record one-month jump, according to Labor Department data. Virtually all of the people returning to work were on temporary layoffs, such as workers in factories, stores, hotels, bars and restaurants that are reopening.At the same time, 759,000 people were laid off from jobs that won’t be coming back. That marks the second-largest monthly increase the United States has ever seen, topped only by an 805,000 jump in January of 2009, in the depths of the Great Recession.”It’s clear that the pandemic is doing some fundamental damage to the job market,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist for Moody’s Analytics. “A lot of the jobs lost aren’t coming back any time soon. The idea that the economy is going to snap back to where it was before the pandemic is clearly not going to happen.”State and local officials test positiveState and local officials have been leading the fight against coronavirus, and some of them have tested positive.Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said she has “no idea” how she was exposed, but that she, her husband and one of her children has tested positive. Their cases are among the more than 97,000 cases in Georgia.At least five California Assembly members tested positive for the virus, leading the state to close its Capitol building in Sacramento, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon confirmed to CNN. California has the second highest number of cases in the country at more than 273,000.The Assembly will remain in recess until further notice to “protect members, staff and the public from exposure,” Rendon added.Many legislators have tested positive for coronavirus in Mississippi, which now has more than 31,000 cases, said Gov. Tate Reeves. Reeves has been tested for the virus and is awaiting results.Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has tested positive for COVID-19, Bolsonaro himself announced, speaking on Brazilian TV channels Tuesday.”Everyone knew that it would reach a considerable part of the population sooner or later. It was positive for me,” Bolsonaro said, referring to the COVID-19 test he took Monday.Bolsonaro previously derided coronavirus as just a “little flu,” and before had appeared in public and at rallies without a mask, even hugging supporters.He has encouraged the country to reopen, even as the number of cases rises, and has criticized local governments’ efforts to stamp out the virus through social distancing measures, such as quarantine and shelter-in-place orders.Rising cases threaten hospital capacityWith increased spread comes concerns about exceeding hospitals’ capacity.Along with 1,214 new cases, Dallas County, Texas, reported a 16% increase in new hospitalizations Monday.Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins released a letter urging the governor to implement more statewide restrictions as the state reached its highest number in both categories.”Think of hospitalizations as the sickest of the sick, the part of the iceberg above the water. In order for the numbers to increase dramatically with hospitalizations, the amount of the iceberg underneath the water must grow exponentially,” Jenkins said.In Florida, 43 hospitals across 21 counties — including Miami-Dade, Broward, Hillsborough and Orange Counties — have hit capacity and show zero ICU beds available, according to data released by the Agency for Health Care Administration.Stop the spread of COVID-19To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend wearing a cloth face mask in public.At least 35 states along with Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico have implemented face covering requirements to help mitigate the virus’ spread.Experts also recommend you keep 6 feet between yourself and others.Make sure to wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.For more tips on how to stay safe, CLICK HERE.

Despite hopes for relief this summer, the U.S. is battling the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic — so much so that across the South and Southwest, contact tracing is no longer possible, according to a health expert.

“The cases are rising so rapidly, that we cannot even do contact tracing anymore. I don’t see how it’s possible to even do that,” Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of tropical medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, told CNN Monday.

Advertisement

The rapid rise in cases is considered a surge, not a second wave, because the infection numbers never lowered to where officials hoped they would, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci said in a Facebook and Twitter livestream Monday.

“We are still knee-deep in the first wave of this,” Fauci said.

The latest numbers

The U.S. has reported more than 2.9 million cases of the virus and at least 130,900 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The national case count hits new records almost daily, Hotez said.

Though Florida set a record for most new cases in a single day over the weekend, the state announced this week that its schools will open their doors in August.

But Florida is among at least 24 that are pausing or rolling back their reopening plans for the summer in light of surging cases.

“It’s hard to do economic reopenings successfully if we don’t get cases in check,” Dr. Mark McClellan, the former Food and Drug Administration commissioner who is advising Texas Gov. Greg Abbott about coronavirus, told CNN on Tuesday.

Abbott last week ordered most of Texas’ population to wear masks in public to help curb transmission.

“We really do need the vast majority of people to do this: to not just avoid crowded bars, but … (also) to wear the mask,” McClellan said.

That flare up can be seen in at least 31 states, where the number of new cases increased from last week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Those states include: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Only four states have seen improvements in the number of cases since the previous week: Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. The remaining 15 states have been holding steady.

One of the main drivers behind the nearly 3 million cases now could be “silent spreaders,” or people who are asymptomatic or presymptomatic, according to a new study.

The report, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that asymptomatic or presymptomatic cases could be responsible for half of cases.

Economic Impact

The June jobs report last week showed a net gain 4.8 million jobs, a record one-month jump, according to Labor Department data. Virtually all of the people returning to work were on temporary layoffs, such as workers in factories, stores, hotels, bars and restaurants that are reopening.

At the same time, 759,000 people were laid off from jobs that won’t be coming back. That marks the second-largest monthly increase the United States has ever seen, topped only by an 805,000 jump in January of 2009, in the depths of the Great Recession.

“It’s clear that the pandemic is doing some fundamental damage to the job market,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist for Moody’s Analytics. “A lot of the jobs lost aren’t coming back any time soon. The idea that the economy is going to snap back to where it was before the pandemic is clearly not going to happen.”

State and local officials test positive

State and local officials have been leading the fight against coronavirus, and some of them have tested positive.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said she has “no idea” how she was exposed, but that she, her husband and one of her children has tested positive. Their cases are among the more than 97,000 cases in Georgia.

At least five California Assembly members tested positive for the virus, leading the state to close its Capitol building in Sacramento, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon confirmed to CNN. California has the second highest number of cases in the country at more than 273,000.

The Assembly will remain in recess until further notice to “protect members, staff and the public from exposure,” Rendon added.

Many legislators have tested positive for coronavirus in Mississippi, which now has more than 31,000 cases, said Gov. Tate Reeves. Reeves has been tested for the virus and is awaiting results.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has tested positive for COVID-19, Bolsonaro himself announced, speaking on Brazilian TV channels Tuesday.

“Everyone knew that it would reach a considerable part of the population sooner or later. It was positive for me,” Bolsonaro said, referring to the COVID-19 test he took Monday.

Bolsonaro previously derided coronavirus as just a “little flu,” and before had appeared in public and at rallies without a mask, even hugging supporters.

He has encouraged the country to reopen, even as the number of cases rises, and has criticized local governments’ efforts to stamp out the virus through social distancing measures, such as quarantine and shelter-in-place orders.

Rising cases threaten hospital capacity

With increased spread comes concerns about exceeding hospitals’ capacity.

Along with 1,214 new cases, Dallas County, Texas, reported a 16% increase in new hospitalizations Monday.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins released a letter urging the governor to implement more statewide restrictions as the state reached its highest number in both categories.

“Think of hospitalizations as the sickest of the sick, the part of the iceberg above the water. In order for the numbers to increase dramatically with hospitalizations, the amount of the iceberg underneath the water must grow exponentially,” Jenkins said.

In Florida, 43 hospitals across 21 counties — including Miami-Dade, Broward, Hillsborough and Orange Counties — have hit capacity and show zero ICU beds available, according to data released by the Agency for Health Care Administration.

Stop the spread of COVID-19

To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend wearing a cloth face mask in public.

At least 35 states along with Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico have implemented face covering requirements to help mitigate the virus’ spread.

Experts also recommend you keep 6 feet between yourself and others.

Make sure to wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

For more tips on how to stay safe, CLICK HERE.